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Thursday, September 12, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Bulbs

In the fall, we are cheered by the arrival of bulbs that promise spring again soon. I have not the smallest wish to diminish that candle: it is the fire that warms gardeners through


These bulbs rekindle spring in the garden almost as soon as they are planted: the fall crocuses, the colchicum, winter cyclamen. They are here so briefly, yet planted early (Run, don’t walk) they spread to form admirable clumps in a garden fast fading. Cyclamen & Colchicum are particularly desirable for the beautiful foliage they contribute in spring, but the Fall Crocus: Saffron, Zonatus & others are bee magnets and there is something particularly wonderful about encountering these gold hearted beauties on a day you know to be shorter than the one before.


The entry of snow/spring crocus onto the scene assures us the year has begun. The valiant blooming of fall crocus in the darkening year gives us confidence that the year will turn again. Is there ONE amongst us who couldn’t use a bit more confidence? Autumn bulbs, I say to you. Autumn bulbs.


Fall is also the only time we can buy some quite rare bulbs as bulbs/ dried roots. Chief amongst these are Eremerus (Foxtail Lily). These perennials form tall clusters of blooms in warm colours during early summer. Bought as plants later in the year, they are far too expensive to group, yet it is in groups they are most impressive, though they disappear after blooming. Their massive blooms make for a dramatic cut flower.

They are dear to my heart because of an early miscommunication with my husband which has led them to be renamed with us: 
 

“Oh,” said I “ I’d like to plant these, they grow 7-8 feet tall”

“78 feet tall?” he (incredulous)

“Oh yes” me, mishearing in my turn.

“In ONE season?

“Mmhmm”

“Well, we HAVE to get those!!!”

We soon got it sorted, but ever since, they are known as the 78 foot candles and have warmed the sunny part of all our gardens.



Tuesday, August 6, 2019
Posted By: Desiree Markewich in Bulbs


With the final days of summer slowly approaching it’s only natural for us gardeners to start planning for next year. The first thing to spring to mind (no pun intended) is fall planting bulbs: Crocus, Tulips, Hyacinth and many more. Often the first sign of colour we are rewarded with in the garden during early spring, planting bulbs in the fall is easy, affordable, and something you must try - if you havent already!

Early Fall (September) is when these flowering beauties start to arrive at the nursery, but we encourage you to Pre-Order early, so you don’t miss out on the 20 stunning new varieties we are recieving this year. 

Early Spring Flowering Bulbs


 
If you want to feel the warm glow of sunshine in early spring, try new varieties Crocus ‘Early Gold’ or Iris ‘Katherine’s Gold’. These yellow cuties are very petite in nature, only growing 4-6 inches tall! This small size makes them perfect for containers or small gardens.
 

Desire something with a bit more colour and size? Try out Narssisus Colourful Companions 'Dancin' in the Sun' combo. An early spring charmer growing to a height of 16 inches and featuring 2 different varieties of white, gold and yellow daffodils.

Mid Spring Flowering Bulbs


For some interest in the garden during mid spring, you can’t go wrong with either Daffodil 'Acropolis' or 'Falmouth Bay'. An elegant almost pure white colour and nice height of 16-20 inches makes this pair stand out among fellow plants gracing the period between spring and summer.

 

The perfect Daffodil (Narcissus) for a patio or smaller garden has to be Narcissus ‘White Petticoat’. Growing to a dimure height of 4 inches, this adorable white daffodil has deep green stems making the crisp white of the blooms even more notable.
 

A featured bulb this year, Tulipa ‘Canadian Liberator’ was released to honour and celebrate 75 years of European Liberation! Canadian Liberator stands tall at 22 inches high and is a strong, bright red, featuring nearly perfect shaped flowers.
 

If you love pink and are looking for some mid spring color we suggest Tulipa ‘Foxtrot’ or Colourful Companions ‘Rasberry Meringue’. Foxtrot is a fragrant, double tulip in a glorious bubblegum pink and Rasberry Meringue combines a creamy white, double daffodil with a matching creamy tulip with raspberry pink accents.

Late Spring


To bring a few splashes of pink to your late spring garden as well, or if enjoy foraging in the garden for cut flower arrangements then you must choose Double Tulip ‘Dazzling Sensation’ or ‘Crispion Sweet’. Crispion Sweet has full, solid pink flowers with fringed petals, while Dazzling Sensation’s blooms are packed with smoother petals with white feathering at the outer petal edges. 
   


Two later Spring flowers that will become a focal point in the garden, and that pollinators can’t miss are Allium ‘Rosy Dream’ and Colourful Companions ‘Hot Shots’. Rosy Dream will grow to 18 inches and feature lovely, globe-like purple blooms, and Hot Shots combines two vivid red tulip varieties that stand at a grand 24 inches tall.


Summer




To get the most out of planting bulbs in the fall you can extend your flowering season into summer by choosing plants such as the Camas or Foxtail Lily. Foxtail Lilies (Eremurus) are extrodinarily tall, perennials that have massive flower spikes. For pink flowers try Eremurus ‘Shelford Pink' or ‘Robustus’ and for orange blooms ‘Cleopatra’. Camassia leichtini ‘Alba’ is an equally tall plant, bearing flower spikes matching the Foxtail Lilies grandeur but in a pale white shade with larger individual flowers upon the spike.   

Garlic

 



If flowers aren’t your thing, or your just enjoy growing your own veggies we suggest planting garlic this fall. Planting garlic is easy, all you have to do is separate each garlic bulb carefully into individual cloves. Plant your cloves in a rich soil by pushing each clove 1-2 inches into the soil with the flat side down and pointed-tip upwards towards the surface of the soil. Your harvest will be ready anytime from Spring through Summer. You will know when the leaves have become mostly yellow, i.e. more yellow on the leaf than there is green. Chesnok, Yugoslavian and Mixed Gourmet varieties are new this year! 

Pre-Order

Any of the bulbs featured in this article. Simply click on the bulb mentioned in the article and it will take you to our pre-order page! 

Pre-Orders end September 1, 2019 when bulbs start to arrive. For availability after September 1 call in store (604) 882 1201.


Friday, October 7, 2016
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Bulbs

The other day our bulb grower mentioned that they had a number of exceptionally unique and rare bulbs available this fall. Being B.C's plant specialists, we snapped them up right away. Here are 7 unique, if not rare bulbs for Fall 2016

Rare Bulbs Fall 2016

Silver Chimes Narcissi

Silver Chimes is a fragrant, multi-headed triandrus Narcissi. Each stem will produce six plus flowers per stem. Flowers are pure white with a small yellow cup. An excellent choice for cut flower displays. Great for naturalizing. Grows to a height of 12 inches. Prefers full to part sun. Flowers in late spring, usually April through May. Deer resistant.

Diskcissel Narcissus jonquilla

Dickcissel Daffodil produces beautiful lemon yellow trumpet shaped flowers with white throats and centers at the end of its stems. Flowers are fragrant and bloom in mid to late spring. Very attractive when planted in groups. Leaves are grass-like and remain dark green in colour. Grows to a height 10 inches. Prefers full to part sun. Great for naturalizing and deer resistant.

Jenny Narcissus cyclamineus

Jenny Narcissus Cyclamineus produces elegant milky-white petals and a lemon trumpet that fades to creamy white. Flowers emerge in March to April and are very distinctive in appearance. Windswept petals are accented by long trumpets. Flowers stand up well to wind and rain making it ideal for west coast. Ideal for naturalizing too. Grows to a height of 12 inches. Prefers full to part sun.

Diamond Ring Narcissi bulbocodium

Diamond Ring is a very floriferous Dutch selection of Narcissi bulbocodium. Cute, small, bright hellow hoop-shaped flowers are accented by thin green foliage in mid spring, typically, late March. Grows to a height of 6 inches. Prefers full to part sun. Great for naturalizing and Deer resistant

Rare Bulbs Fall 2016

Tommansinianus Snow Crocus

Beautiful pale lavender to deep reddish purple flowers grow on this Heirloom Snow Crocus bulb from 1847. Silvery or creamy accents may appear on the outside of the flower. It naturalizes beautiful and claims to be squirrel resistant as well. Grows to a height of 3 inches. Prefers full to part sun. Flowers in early spring.

G.P. Baker Corydalis

G.P. Baker is a much sought after spectacular dark pink, almost red Corydalis. An excellent perennial variety for creating an unusual splash of colour in a woodland setting. Flowers in late Spring. Grows to a height of 6 inches. Great for naturalizing. Deer resistant. Plant in full to part sun.

Allium Red Mohican

Red Mohican is a flowering allium (onion) with an unusual Bordeaux red colour and a white crest. It’s a form of Allium amethystinus that Flowers in late Spring. Stems are bent when they first appear but gradually straighten out before the flower develops. Grows to a height of 40 inches. An excellent garden plant to attract bees and butterflies as well as being a wonderful cut flower that can last up to 3 weeks. Prefers full to part sun and well drained fertile soil. It is great for naturalizing and is also Deer resistant.

We hope you enjoy these wonderful selections as much as we do! If you are making a special trip, please call ahead 604.882.1201, to confirm availability, as they may sell out quickly.


Sunday, September 7, 2014
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Bulbs

Every year in September our fall planting, spring blooming flower bulbs arrive. Colourful tulips, delightful daffodils, fragrant hyacinths and dainty crocus are unpacked and made available for purchase. The best part of this task is discovering what the new varieties are for this year. So far, we've seen a nice selection of new tulips, a new daffodil, a handful of interesting crocus and even two new varieties of garlic. So without further ado, here are the new flower bulbs at Arts Nursery for 2014.

New Crocus Varieties

Orange Monarch Snow Crocus

Orange Monarch Snow Crocus

This super popular flaming orange crocus was originally available last year in limited quantities and is back again in larger numbers. Black streaks accent the orange flower colour. As a Snow Crocus, it is slightly smaller, growing to only 4 inches in height and flowers in early spring. Narrow green leaves have a silver stripe down the middle. Grow Orange Monarch in full sun and space the bulbs about 2 inches apart.

Yalta Crocus

Yalta Crocus

Yalta is a new variety of naturalizing crocus with flowers that are both white and purple. It sports some of the biggest crocus blooms available. Narrow green leaves have a slivery strip down the middle for added interest. Grows to 4 inches in height and should be planted in full sun. Blooms in early spring.

Sieberi Spring Beauty Snow Crocus

Sieberi Spring Beauty Snow Crocus

This hard to find variety of Snow Crocus is bi-coloured in shades of white, purple and even a hint of lavender. It is a variety that is good for naturalizing and like many of the others, features green narrow foliage with a silver stripe down the middle. Grow it in full sun and space the bulbs 2 inches apart. Grows to a height of 4 inches

New Tulip Varieties

Tender Whisper Tulip

Tender Whisper Triumph Tulip

Although it is a Triumph Tulip variety, Tender Whisper looks almost like a lily-flowered tulip. Flowers are unusually shaped and feature a white base blending towards pinkish red near the top. Strong stems make it an excellent cut flower too! Tender Whisper blooms in mid-spring and grows to a height of 18 inches. Plant in full sun and space bulbs 4 inches apart.

Delight Series Tulips

Delight Series Single Early Tulips

These four Single Early Tulips are available in 4 distinct varieties: Apricot Delight, Candy Apple Delight, Cherry Delight and Rosy Delight. Apricot Delight has flowers that are pink blushed to white. Cherry Delight has mid to dark shades of red. Rosy Delight is mostly pink while Candy Apple featured red, pink and creamy coloured margins. All four varieties are good cut flowers and will grow to a height of 14 inches. They bloom in mid-spring. Grow in full sun and space bulbs 4 inches apart.

Siesta Tulip

Siesta Fringed Tulips

Purple and pink petals edged white with lace-like fringes make Siesta a show stopper. Blooming in late spring, Siesta is a good cut flower reaching to 16 inches in height. Grow it in full sun and space bulbs 4 inches apart.

Boston Tulip

Boston Triumph Tulips

Boston is a new, attention grabbing two-toned red and yellow tulip that grows to 18 inches in height. An excellent cut flower, it blooms in mid-spring and will also attract bees and hummingbirds with its light fragrance. Like the other tulips, grow it in full sun and space bulbs 4 inches apart.

Prins Willem Alexander Tulip

Prins Willem Alexander Triumph Tulips

This attractive, orange-coloured Triumph Tulip is named to honour the new King of the Netherlands, Willem Alexander. Growing to 20 inches in height on strong stems also makes it suitable as a cut flower variety. Blooms in mid-spring and like the others should be planted in the full sun.

Miami Sunset Tulip

Miami Sunset

Miami Sunset is a gorgeous fringed tulip variety with vivid tropical colours ranging from red, through pink and orange and even a hint of yellow near the base. Distinctive fringed edges add even more interest. Miami Sunset blooms in late spring and will reach a height of 18 inches. Grow in full sun and space bulbs 4 inches apart.

Humilis Tete a Tete Tulip

Humilis Tete a Tete Multiflowering Tulip

Tete a Tete is the first ever double-petalled, multi-flowering tulip. They bloom in mid-spring and very short stems that will only reach 4 inches in height. Flowers are red in colour and can be used as a short cut flower. Each stem will produce 4-6 full sized flowers! They will make quite a display in beds, containers and borders. Grow in full sun and space bulbs 4 inches apart.

Praestans Shogun Tulip

Praestans Shogun Mini Botanical Tulip

This 10 inch high botanical tulip variety produces 3-4 brightly coloured yellow and orange blooms per stem in early to mid-spring. Praestans Shogun creates a woodland look and naturalizes well. It can even form a beautiful floral groundcover when planted close together. They are ideal for rock gardens, containers and borders. As an added bonus, their flowers are extremely long lasting, sometimes holding their flowers for several weeks! Plant in full to part sun and space bulbs 3 inches apart.

New Daffodil Varieties

Smiling Twin Narcissus / Daffodil

Smiling Twin Novelty Narcissus

Smiling Twin is a split-corona Narcissus (or Daffodil) with colours ranging from creamy yellow to lemon yellow near the center. It blooms in mid-spring with a nice fragrance and grows to a height of about 16 inches. Grow in full sun to light shade and space bulbs 6 inches apart. As an added benefit, narcissus are also deer resistant, naturalizing and can attract bees and hummingbirds to your garden.

New Garlic Varieties

Music Garlic

Music Garlic

This hardneck garlic variety has easily peeled cloves, a strong flavor and a luscious lasting after taste. Their cloves are often larger and have less of an outer wrapper. The flavour is pungent, sweet and good and can be quite hot if eaten raw, Like all garlics, Music should be grown in the full sun and spaced about 6 inches apart.

Siberian Garlic

Siberian Garlic

Siberian Garlic is attractive, flavourful and offers plenty of heat if eaten raw. The bulb is white with streaks of reddish purple. This hardneck variety produces larger, but fewer cloves than do the softneck varieties. Garlic is also deer resistant and will also help keep insects and fungal diseases in check. Plant in full sun and space 6 inches apart.

Bulb Planting & Care

The best time to plant bulbs is in the late summer and early fall, just as the autumn rains begin. Choose bulbs that are strong and solid, not mushy. When planting bulbs, dig a hole 2-3 times the height of the bulb and add bonemeal. Drop the bulb into the hole with the pointy side up. Not all bulbs have a pointy side, so do your best to figure out which side is the top. Fill the hole back up with soil and add Bulb Fertilizer on top for extra growth. Space bulbs close together, but not touching. For best effect, create large drifts or swatches of colour instead of planting one here and one there.

You can also plant bulbs in layers in either containers or the garden. It is a good idea to put labels or tags into the area so you remember what you planted! Once bulbs have finished blooming, allow their foliage to die back and yellow naturally. This allows the plant to put energy back into the bulb for next years display. Wait as long as you can before cutting back the foliage.

For best selection, drop by Art’s Nursery this September and choose your bulbs when the selection is at its peak! If you have any questions about these spring blooming bulbs, feel free to visit us in person or give us a call at 604.882.1201


Tuesday, September 11, 2012
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Bulbs

Bulb DesignGone are the days for straight soldierly rows of single variety bulbs…unless you are colour blocking for some intricate design. If you take a page out of Mother nature’s book you’ll notice drifts and groupings of flowers.

Similarly, plant your bulbs in drifts and groupings. Layer your varieties with similar bloom times to create stunning spring focal points. Here are some tricks of the trade to help you design like a pro.

Here are a few bulb basics…

from some questions we get about bulbs frequently at the nursery:

3 Times The Height if the Bulb

  • In general, we plant them three times the depth of the bulb.
  • If you accidently plant them upside down, don’t worry. Bulbs will find the surface. They’ll just take a tiny bit longer. If you are not sure which end is up…every gardener has one of these days, plant it on it’s side.
  • Drainage, drainage, drainage. Whether planting bulbs in pots or in the ground, excellent drainage is essential!!
  • Fertilizer goes into the planting hole…bulb food or bonemeal will do nicely.
  • Do not cut back the leaves or tie or fold. The leaves are using photosynthesis to create food to store in the bulb which is responsible for next years bloom. Anything that will interfere with photosynthesis will interfere with next years bloom. You can cut, fold, pleat and even weave the leaves if you fancy once they’ve yellowed. This means they are finished producing food…unless they are yellowing before they’ve even bloomed if this is happening refer back to the drainage line.
  • A great digging spade is all you need to plant most of the time. I do not dig individual holes. I just dig a wide hole and usually just pour the bulbs right in after the fertilizer. A bulb trowel is another option if you prefer.

Bulb Fertilizers

Here are some design tips and tricks:

When creating your fall and winter planters, don’t forget to tuck in some Crocus bulbs or tiny Narcissi, they are fully hardy and will be a wonderful surprise in late winter/early spring.

You can layer bulbs by putting the larger ones on the bottom and the smaller ones on the top.  Daffodils and Grape Hyacinth are a classic example.  The blues and yellows make an eye catching combo.  Remember to choose bulbs with smaller strappy foliage when combining with the smaller ones.  Last year I used tulips and smaller muscari and I had to lift up the great big leaves of the tulips I chose to even see the little muscarii…lesson learned.

Daffodils and Muscari

Create a big drift of bulbs around the base of a large leaved perennial like a hosta for instance.  This way the leaves of the hosta will grow up to cover the spent foliage of the bulbs.

If you want to extend the bloom time of the bulbs in a container, plant some deeper than the others.   I wanted a massed planter of red tulips and I wanted it to last for at least a month.  I planted some of the bulbs twice as deep as they should be and then added soil and another layer, soil and the final layer.  The bulbs closest to the surface came up first, then the next row and then the next.  I had neighbours asking me what variety they were because they’d lasted so long.

You can mix varieties will similar bloom times and you can mix different colours of the same bulbs you can even use the bulb layering technique above with graduated colours so it looks like your white tulibs start getting pink and then deep rose…you get the picture. 

Just try not to mix parrot type tulips with the regulars.  The parrot tulips carry a virus that allowed them to have their interesting colour streaking.  It doesn’t look so good on the regulars though.  For those of you who are designed challenged in this area there are combo packages made up for you!

Squirrels!  Mine have exquisite taste.  To avoid feeding them your bulbs, you can plant a particularly stinky bulb for them  - the Frittilaria. 

Fritillaria

It’s actually a lovely looking flower and if you plant some among your groupings their stink will hide the smell of the tastier bulbs.  You can also add large squares of chicken wire over your plantings and then cover with mulch so you don’t have to look at it.

So, get out there, be daring and have fun!!  My neighbour up the street planted a heart out of crocus bulbs in the lawn…so romantic.  Hope it worked out.  Don’t forget to send me a picture :)

P.S. dont forget about Surrey Memorial Hospitals Tulips for Tomorrow fundraising campaign. Drop by Art's Nursery and pick up a pack or two. $10 bucks get you 10 Princess Irene Tulips with all proceeds going to the hospital.


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Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

We pride ourselves on providing high quality plant, expert advice and an exceptional gardening experience.


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8940 192nd Street,
Surrey, BC, Canada,
V4N 3W8

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