Thursday, June 20, 2019
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Shrubs

Hydrangeas are a lovely and diverse genus, many of which have become essential parts of our garden vocabulary.
Hydrangea Group

Most of us are familiar with the "old fashioned hydrangea": hydrangea macrophylla, and mostly with it in its round headed (mob-cap) form. In England, this variety is called "mob-cap" after the rounded cap worn indoors by married women in the late 18th/early 19th century. Here in North America, they are more usually called mop heads. Having grown up in an English tradition, I found this very odd at first!!
Hydrangea Mophead

This shrub has a lot going for it: it flowers for a very long time starting in the summer when few shrubs but roses are in bloom. Unlike the rose it is equally happy in sun and in shade, though it requires more water in full sun. And, also unlike the rose, it needs no deadheading or summer pruning; the round flowers of macrophylla are lovely from the time they first appear, often in strange shades of ivory & green, slowly deepening to their ultimate colours of blue or pink, and then, as fall approaches, evolving into yet stranger colours of violet, burgundy, wine and tan. These flowers dry well, and, if you like, can be sprayed with gold for Christmas decoration!
Lacecap Hydrangea

As well as mobcaps, hydrangea macrophylla has a lacecap form. Like the dogwood, what appears to be a flower is actually a bract surrounding the true flower, which is comparatively insignificant. In the mobcap above, the bulk of the flower is made of infertile bracts. In the lacecap, the centre of the flower is made up of tiny fertile flowers with a surrounding circle of bracts, looking much like a lace doily, or old fashioned lace cap, hence the name. These plants are generally more open and graceful in appearance than the mobcaps, but have many of the same attributes.

Both kinds of hydrangeas serve a good purpose in garden design. They fit very well with rhododendrons, liking the same conditions of soil and sun, and adding garden colour at a time when rhododendrons are long over. The lacecap is particularly nice here, its grace contrasting with the bulkier shape of rhododendrons. They fit equally well with the long blooming summer & fall perennials, adding some restful substance to the border.

Pannicle Hydrangea

In addition to these two forms of H. macrophylla, hydrangea paniculata (Peegee) is a treasured garden plant. Instead of a dome, the flowers form a cone, initially white (or green) deepening to rosy red and ultimately burgundy in a way reminiscent of macrophylla, but more striking because of the size of the flower. The plant too is larger with quite a different garden effect, with strong wands growing upwards. Often grown as a standard (("tree form") it makes a terrific central feature in a frontal bed.

Macrophylla in both its forms and paniculata are those most often encountered in gardens; but there are many others: hydrangea arborescens Annabelle (a very hardy form, blooming on new wood), hydrangea quercifolia (oakleaf hydrangea - very handsome in woodland), hydrangea aspera (extraordinarily shade tolerant) and of course, the climbing hydrangea: hydrangea petiolaris). These are all excellent plants but more suited to a wilder sort of garden than macrophylla and paniculata.

Some well established favourites:
 

Macrophylla : first the mobcaps

Sister Theresa pure white, each flower with a pale blue eye
Nikko Blue very large turquoise, a bit floppy, but gorgeous in acid soil
Glowing Embers reliably red in any soil

Lovely Lacecaps

Blaumeise (Teller Blue) blue turning brilliant pink in basic (alkaline) soil
Kardinal (Teller Red) rich deep pink turning purple in acid soil
Libelle (Teller White) white with deep blue centre which centre turns pink in basic soil

Paniculatas

Paniculata Grandiflora (the original PeeGee) pure white flowers aging rosy pink
Limelight soft green aging to pink
Brussels Lace a rare form with flowers like a lacecap white with no colour change
Quickfire white flowers turning pinkish red
 

For more information about growing Hydrangeas, read the Learn to Grow Hydrangeas Blog Post
If you're interested in any of these beautiful Hydrangeas, drop by the nursery and check out our collection. As always the selection and availability is always changing so call ahead if you're making a special trip


Thursday, June 20, 2019
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Shrubs

Hydrangeas are a very easy care shrub, especially for us here on the west coast, but good cultivation will bring out their best.

First of all, like most shrubs, they should be planted in fertile (organically rich), well drained soil, but with the additional caution that you must be able to water them easily! Hydrangeas need hydrating!! This is particularly true in sunny sites and in the first while after planting. Never forget that it takes a while for roots to get out into the surrounding soil, so as far as the new plant is concerned, it is still in a pot, and so should be watered thoroughly AT LEAST once a week.

After the plant is established, it will still need watering in times of drought, and will be one of the first plants in your garden to droop by way of letting you know things are getting dry.

Hydrangea Group

Macrophylla hydrangeas (mobcap/mophead & lacecap) produce their blooms from buds formed the summer before (old wood). Therefore, pruning in autumn or too early in spring can inhibit, even prevent, flowers. When the last frosts are over, the old flower heads should be cut back to the first pair of healthy buds below them. Any dead, or spindly branches should be removed at the base, and where there are untidy crossover branches choose the healthiest of these and remove the other. It should be noted that some of the newer cultivars have been bred to bloom on both old & new wood: but the advice of pruning for strength still applies.

Paniculata, on the other hand, blooms on new wood formed in the growing season and is also hardier than macrophylla. It can therefore be pruned in late winter to early spring as needed. An extremely vigorous plant, the shrub form is going to produce much larger flowers if restricted to 7 to 11 vigorous primary shoots. If grown as a standard, the plant will need rigorous pruning to keep it in good shape, but the same general guide of fewer, stronger shoots applies.

For both types, a good mulch in the spring and fall will help keep weeds down and preserve soil moisture. Feeding once a year with a slow release all purpose fertilizer will promote vigorous growth which will in turn provide for more abundant flowers.
Change Hydrangea Flower Colour

How to Change The Colour of Your Hydrangea

 

Most blue or pink Hydrangea macrophylla varieties can change their flower colour based on soil acidity and the presence of aluminum in the soil. If the soil is acidic (a pH of less than 7), the plant is able to absorb aluminum from the soil and turn the flowers more blue. Common soil acidifiers include sulfur, peat moss and various fertilizer products like Rhodo and Azalea fertilizers. The colour transformation happens slowly of the course of 1-2 seasons. If you want your flowers to be more pink, sweeten your soil, that is - make it less acidic - more alkaline, with lime, bonemeal and other similar products. A pH higher than 7 reduces the plants ability to absorb aluminum and turns the flowers more pink. Again this change happens over several seasons.


Friday, May 24, 2019
Posted By: Desiree MArkewich in Feature Products
This week were featuring Hop Organic Compost, Persimmon Trees, a Spinning Gum, a Ruffled Echeveria and a number of other very cool plants. Check out What's New for May 24 2019 at Arts Nursery
Hop Organic Compost

Hop Organic Compost

Hop uses patented technology to transform food scraps into Canada’s most nutrient-rich organic compost. Hop is a craft compost that nourishes soil with organic matter and macro-nutrients for sustained plant growth. Simply add a 1 inch top dressing of Hop to native soil. Contains 84% organic matter with a guaranteed analysis of 2.8-1.4-1.5. Hop is OMRI Listed for Certified Organic food growth in Canada

Fuyu Japanese Persimmon Tree

Fuyu Japanese Persimmon

Diospyros kaki 'Fuyu'

Fuyu Persimmon is an outstanding deciduous fruit tree. Fall foliage is a brilliant orange-red. Showy, bright orange-scarlet fruit ripens in late fall and remains on the bare stems well into winter. Non-astringent, firm-fleshed fruit is best if given time to soften slightly after harvesting from tree. Very late to leaf out and to produce fruit. Best grown in full sun. Can reach 30ft in height.

  Ruffles Echeveria

Echeveria Ruffles

Ruffles Echeveria is a stunning succulent with dramatically ruffled, fleshy gray-green rosettes and a soft red edging that is more intense in full sun. Red-orange flowers appear on tall stalks in late summer. Adds a wonderful texture to rock gardens, dry borders, and containers. A frost-tender evergreen. Must be brought inside before frost. Best in full sun

Baptisia Decadence Lemon Meringue

Baptisia Decadence Lemon Meringue

Lemon Meringue False Indigo

Baptisia Lemon Meringue is a North American native perennial with long, charcoal grey stems that carry cool lemon yellow flowers. Excellent floral display atop the compact, upright mound of blue-green foliage. Grows 30-36 inches in height and spread. Best in full to part sun. Hardy in zones 4-9

Joanna Marlene Itoh Peony

Joanna Marlene Itoh Peony

Paeonia Itoh Joanna Marlene

Joanna Marlene Itoh Peonies feature very large, semi-double yellow blooms with a rich golden center and a deep pink blush on the outer petals that develops into a peachy salmon color as they mature. The magnificent blooms are held on strong stems just above sturdy, compact plants with lush, dark green foliage. A wonderful addition to any spring bouquet. An herbaceous perennial. Hardy in USDA zones 4-9. Best grown in full to part sun. Can reach 30 inches in height and similar spread.

Spinning Gum Tree

Spinning Gum Tree

Eucalyptus perriniana 
In its native habitat of Australia, the Spinning Gum Tree is a fast growing evergreen tree with a spreading habit. Smooth bark flakes off in ribbons in colours of white, gray and green. Attractive scented foliage gives off a menthol-like aroma. Leaves begin begin rounded and mature to a lance-shape over time. Creamy white flowers emerge in spring in clusters. Awesome specimen tree, but not quite hardy enough in our climate. Zones 8-10. Can grow to 30ft in height and 15-20ft wide. Best grown in full sun in moist, but well drained soils. Mini Bonsai Azaleas

Mini Bonsai Azaleas

Red, Rose and Purple

These mini azaleas are perfect as outdoor table-top specimens or bonsai starts. Cool sizes and shapes. Three colours available. Red, Rose or Purple, Best grown in part to full sun. Blooms in spring.

If you're interested in any of these cool new plants or products, drop by the nursery or give us a call at 604.882.1201. As always, our selection is always changing and quantities may be limited. Please call ahead to reserve if you are making a special trip and we'd be happy to put a few of these treasures aside for you


Friday, May 10, 2019
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Hanging Baskets

We have a huge variety and selection of Hanging Baskets at our Nursery and May is the perfect time of year to welcome these to your home. As you pick your perfect baskets for your home, remember that there are a couple of tips to keeping them looking great all season long.
Shelley with Hanging Basket

Size Matters!

First pick the biggest hanging baskets you can. Small baskets are more prone to drying out or running out of nutrients because they only have a small amount of soil. Bigger baskets look better! The basket should also match the scale of your home.
Begonia Basket for Shade

Right Plant – Right Place

Most baskets are designed for a specific amount of sunlight. Pick your baskets to match your environment. Baskets with lots of shade lovers like coleus or fuchsias need less sun. Other types of flowers like petunias will thrive in the full sun.

Watering

Moss baskets tend to dry out the fastest, wood and plastic baskets hold the water a little longer. When watering, avoid getting the foliage wet. Wet foliage can cause mold, disease and pest infestations. Instead, put your watering wand as close to the soil as possible. Water the basket thoroughly. You should see water coming out the bottom of the basket in a steady stream. You can check whether your basket needs water by giving it a little lift. A heavy basket indicates lots of water, while a light basket will need a drink. Most baskets will need to be watered at least once a day depending on the weather and temperature.
Hanging Basket Food

Feeding

Most baskets had fertilizer included in the soil when they started growing. By the time you purchase them, that fertilizer may already have been exhausted. Add a slow release Hanging Basket Food like our GardenPro 14-14-14 to your baskets as a long term food supply. This should give you blooms all season long, probably up to the first frosts. However, most annuals will stop blooming when they run out of food. The second thing you should do is to use a water soluble All Purpose 20-20-20 fertilizer and mix it into your watering can. Apply this on every third watering. You won’t believe the difference it makes!

Group of Hanging Baskets

Maintenance

Many annuals in your basket will look better if you ‘deadhead’. That is, removing the spent flowers. Some of these plants will also tend to stretch of get ‘leggy’. They can benefit from being cut back and then allowing them to rejuvenate and regrow. You may also find it beneficial to occasionally spin or re-orient your baskets so that all sides get the same amount of sunlight.

Hope these hanging basket tips help you enjoy your purchase even more! If you have any questions about your hanging baskets, please call or visit Arts Nursery and we would be happy to help!
For more information, check out our Manager Shelley's own blog for more tips on reviving hanging baskets during the hot summer months.
https://www.sowanddipity.com/revive-hanging-baskets/
 


Sunday, March 31, 2019
Posted By: Diane Scott in Roses
Rosa 'Diane Loomer'
This year we were lucky enough to acquire four very special roses from acclaimed local rose hybridizer, Brad Jalbert of Select Roses. While many of his varieties are now available around the globe, only a few local retail nurseries have been offered the honour of carrying Brad’s roses.
Rosa 'Diane Loomer' 
Among these exceptional bushes is the rose ‘Diane Loomer’. Named for the first woman to conduct the National Youth Choir of Canada, Diane Loomer was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in 1999. This hybrid tea rose has an upright growth of 3-4 feet with large fragrant blooms (4-5 inches) that change from golden to apricot prink. This amazing rose is a continual bloomer from spring to fall.
Rosa 'Dylan'
Our second and newest Select rose is called ‘Dylan’. With blooms of the softest pink, this compact floribunda rose grows to about 3 feet tall. Easy to grow with foliage that has exceptional resistance to disease. Endless, long-lasting blooms on strong stems will enhance your garden all summer long. These would do well in all landscapes from mass plantings to a single container on your deck.
Rosa 'Our Anniversary'
Planted in Stanley Park and various parks in around Surrey, ‘Our Anniversary’ is truly a rose for the lower mainland. With blooms starting plum red deepening to a deep plum purple (weather dependent), this dense bushy floribunda has spectacular glossy green foliage and a light, sweet fragrance. Its disease resistance in all climates makes it popular around the world. Growing to approximately 2.5 feet tall, this rose would be great in containers.

The fourth offering is the ‘Vogue Anniversary’ rose. After looking at many options, Vogue magazine chose this bushy dwarf floribunda to honour its 125 anniversary. An English style rose with golden peach blooms and bright green foliage, it has great resistance to black spot and mildew. A fragrant compact rose, it would work well in a border garden, in smaller gardens or in a pot on the deck. 

Start feeding your roses this year with Select Roses plant food. We have both the Rose food and the Rose Starter food. Both are slow release. This means you can use them for your spring and summer rose feeding. Apply fertilizer in the spring when the soil, as well as the air, is warm, usually about mid April (this means temperatures stay above 10˚ C at night). Re-apply in mid June just after the first blooms. 
Rosa 'Dylan'
The rose food has an N-P-K ratio of 21-9-15, organic based with traces of micro nutrients for a perfectly balanced rose food. This one is preferred by the Vancouver Rose Society. The Rose Starter (N-P-K ratios of 1-3-15) is balanced for better root development and more blooms in the first year. It works well as an all purpose for your other plantings as well. We are offering both in the smaller container, the one with the hand grip for ease of use, at $14.98.

All four roses will be available in 3 gallon pots for pre-order on our website with pickup at the beginning of May.

For more information abour Brad Jalbert and his roses visit his website www.selectroses.ca


 

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Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

We pride ourselves on providing high quality plant, expert advice and an exceptional gardening experience.


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Recent Posts

Thursday, June 20, 2019
Introduction to Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas are a lovely and diverse genus, many of which have become essential parts of our garden v...

Thursday, June 20, 2019
Learn to Grow Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas are a very easy care shrub, especially for us here on the west coast, but good cultivatio...

Friday, May 24, 2019
Whats New May 24 2019

This week were featuring Hop Organic Compost, Persimmon Trees, a Ruffled Echeveria and a number of other very cool plants. Check out What's New for May 24 2019 at Arts Nursery

Friday, May 10, 2019
Hanging Basket Care and Tips

We have a huge variety and selection of Hanging Baskets at our Nursery and May is the perfect time o...

Sunday, March 31, 2019
Select Roses for Select Retail Nurseries

This year we were lucky enough to acquire four very special roses from acclaimed local rose hybridiz...

Tuesday, December 4, 2018
Winter Containers

Many of us plant containers for summer interest and leave them empty for the winter. I get very exci...

Wednesday, November 28, 2018
20 Great Gift Ideas For Christmas

Are you trying to figure out what to get everyone on your list for Christmas? We know it can be chal...


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