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How To Grow Gooseberries

gooseberries

Gooseberries are attractive deciduous shrubs known for their vicious thorns and delectable old world fruit. Gooseberry plants have a compact arching habit and can grow 4-6ft in height. Interestingly enough, they are one of the first deciduous shrubs to leaf out in spring as well as one of the first to drop their leaves in fall. Gooseberry fruits are borne individually along the thorny, arching canes.

As far as flavour goes, gooseberries tend to be tart - many varieties should be cooked before being enjoyed. They have a long history of being used in pies, pastries and preserves.

Exposure / Moisture

Gooseberries should be planted in the full sun.

Soil / Moisture

Gooseberries can be grown in most moderately fertile soils. A soil that is moist, but well drained is usually recommend. These plants are fairly drought tolerant once established, but for best fruit production, water during dry spells.

Fertilizing

Use an all purpose or rose fertilizer on gooseberry plants if you want to achieve more vigorous growth. Otherwise, regular fertilization is not normally required. If used, apply fertilizer in early spring before fruit set. An application of compost or manure is also beneficial when done each year.

Pruning Gooseberries

Regular pruning is not required, but the plants will produce more fruit if pruned. Individual canes produce berries for several years, with the best growth between the 2nd and 4th year. Too many old canes can reduce the yield. Each year prune away 3-4 canes and allow new ones to grow in their place. This cycle will ensure steady fruit production in the future.

For More Information

Art's Nursery carries several varieties of gooseberries. For more information visit us or call 604.882.1201

Author: Arts Nursery Ltd. Source: Arts Nursery Ltd.
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