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Monday, September 10, 2018

From Garden to Table

Try Growing Fall Veggies

Posted By: Sheri Piccione in Edibles

On August 29th, I was lucky enough to attend the Coquitlam Farmer’s Market Long Table Dinner, to which the wonderful event was held at Red Barn Plants and Produce, in Maple Ridge. It was great to be at the source of such wonderful food, all growing fresh around us!

All of the food that was served came from local food producers, and primarily from the vendors that frequent the weekly market on Sundays. The funds from this event go directly to the market’s Power of Produce kid’s club. This program happens at the market each Sunday, and teaches kids about local, fresh food through information and a fun activity.
Veggies Growing in Garden

Below is a photo that was a simple salad made from in season radish, cooked beets, tossed with fresh salad greens, candied walnuts and cheese from Golden Ears Cheese Crafters.

But then I thought, while looking at this fantastic plate, and the greens growing around me, of my tired garden. Spring and summer are rushed times at the nursery and in life, but I was inspired to go back to my garden, as now is time for fall clean-up of tomatoes and bolted lettuces. While it may be a bit late to direct seed many veggies, now is perfect timing for cool season starts, such as lettuces, arugula, cabbage, broccoli, kale and cauliflower. Garlic can go in now for next summer too!
Farmers Market Salad

Share with us! Have you planted a fall/winter garden? Do you have fresh garden to table veggies planted? Send us your photos. Or, have questions on fall gardening, come on into the nursery and ask us! And while you are here, grab some fresh starts for your garden.

For more information on the Coquitlam Farmer’s Market, and their Power of Produce kid’s program, please visit: https://makebakegrow.com/contact-us/ Or visit the market on Sunday’s at the Dogwood Pavilion on Poirier Street from 9 am to 1 pm.

Radish In The GardenFall and Winter Veggies
Written By Amanda Smith


Sunday, September 13, 2015
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Edibles

Nine months may seem like a long time to wait for just some garlic, but it's well worth the wait!

When planting garlic it is best to plant from mid-September to late October. Garlic grows very well in cooler weather and that is why it is best to plant in the fall. Garlic cloves require about 9 months to fully develop. A Fall planting is next years summer harvest!

Red Russian Garlic Bulbs

Planting Garlic

Now it's time to plant it in the ground. Choose a bulb that is a good size and fairly firm. Break it apart into separate cloves. The paper wrapping can stay on the cloves, it makes no difference. When choosing a spot to plant the garlic, make sure that the soil is well drained, but still moist.

How deep to plant the garlic cloves depends on your climate. In  mild winter areas,  the garlic can be planted 1-2 inches deep. In a severe winter climate, the garlic should be planted 2-4 inches deep.

Spacing Garlic

The minimum spacing should be 4 inches apart between cloves and 8 inches apart in rows.. To grow large garlic bulbs, space the cloves 6 inches apart and the row 12 inches apart for best results. Soon after planting the cloves, spread mulch over the area. In spring, the garlic begins to grow. To help the garlic grow to its full potential, keep the soil evenly moist and keep the area weed free.

Fertilizing Garlic

To help the garlic grow, sprinkle a bit of manure or compost around the area. As nitrogen is one of garlic’s major nutrient requirements, foliar fertilizer is beneficial. From personal experience, we highly recommend the use of Gaia Green Fertilizers on garlic. The results are spectacular!

Harvesting Garlic

Summer is when the garlic is maturing and almost ready to harvest. Harvesting can be a bit tricky. When the bulbs are maturing, the leaves will start to turn yellow and brown. If two thirds of the leaves are brown then the garlic is ready to harvest. In our area, this us usually between July-August.

To harvest, just loosen the soil around the bulbs by using a digging fork. Gently retrieve the garlic bulbs and brush off the excess dirt right away and do not wash the garlic. After harvesting your now beautiful garlic bulbs, it’s time to cure them. Tie loosely together by the leaves or stalks of 8-12 plants in a bundle and hang under an area that has a cover. If the leaves or stalks are kept attached to the bulb, the garlic can be stored longer.

Curing Garlic

Curing can take 2-3 weeks or up to 2 months depending on the humidity and the air circulation. If you choose not to hang the bulbs and are storing them in sacks, cut off the stocks about 1/2 an inch above the bulb. Gently clean off the bulb with a soft brush avoiding tearing the paper off.

Storing Garlic

The last step that is needed from growing your own garlic is knowing how to store it properly. The garlic should be stored in a cool dry place out of direct sunlight. Softneck types of garlic will produce smaller cloves, but will keep for longer. The hardneck varieties of garlic have a shorter shelf life, but will produce larger cloves. Enjoy your home grown garlic that will add great flavor to all your meals!

Types Of Garlic

This year (2015), we are proud to offer a large and diverse selection of garlic, including the ever popular Red Russian Garlic variety. This year's line up includes:

2015 Garlic Availability

Bogatyr

Bogatyr garlic is known as the marbled purple stripe garlic for its bold colours. The Bogatyr bulbs are small and will normally grow 5-6 cloves in one bulb. Though it has less cloves, the flavour is hot and spicy. Known to be one of the hottest garlics in the hardnek variety.

Duganski

Duganski garlic comes wrapped in a purple colour wrapper. With its bold hot taste there are 8-12 cloves that can be used. This type of garlic stores very well for up to 8-10 months.

Elephant Garlic

It’s all in the name. Every bulb is huge and a clove can almost be the size of a bulb of ordinary garlic. Though it may seem like it should have a strong taste, Elephant Garlic is actually rather sweet, less intense than other garlics.

German Hardneck

German hardneck is great for roasting from the large cloves. Each bulb will typically grow to 1 ½ to 2 inches. The German Hardneck garlic will produce a woody flower stalk and has many great flavours to it.

Legacy

Legacy garlic will produce 7-9 cloves in each bulb. This type of garlic does extremely well in cold climates. The flavour of this garlic is rich and spicy, best when it’s fresh.

2015 Garlic Availability 2

Metechi

When matured, the Metechi garlic has a very strong taste but great for cooking. Each bulb grows 5-7 very large cloves and it stores very well, for they stay firmer for longer.

Mexican Purple Garlic

Mexican Purple Garlic is incredibly popular in parts of South America and Mexico. Not generally available in North America, but it is quickly gaining popularity. The garlic has a hot flavor raw, but becomes milder when baked. Typically yields at least 8 cloves per bulb.

Music

Music garlic is part of the hardneck variety that have more subtle flvours. These cloves store 3-6 months in a dry cool area. The flavour that this garlic has is a medium to hot flavour with a rich taste.

Russian Red

Russian red garlic grows 6-8 large cloves with a hot,  but barable taste. The Russian Red is a very popular variety in garlic. The bulbs will have a slightly purple colour to them. This year we are also caring an organic Russian Red Bulk Garlic. Call us for details!

Regular White Garlic

The standard in produce departments, the regular white garlic is solid light coloured, with little if any streaking. Good dependable flavor and production.

Siberian

The Siberian garlic thrives in cold weather. It produces a garlic that has a medium to strong flavour that will be great in any dish. The large bulbs normally produce 5-9 good size cloves. The outer wrapping of the bulb has a purple hue to it.

At publish date, September 2015, all of these varieties were available and in-stock. As always, call ahead, 604.882.1201, to confirm availability. They will also be available soon for online purchase (In Canada), while qty's last.

Special thanks to Kara, on our always cheerful Cashiers for compiling and documenting the contents of this post! She now knows more about garlic than she ever knew possible!


Thursday, June 11, 2015
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Edibles

Tomatoes are one of the most rewarding edible plants you can grow you can grow in your garden. A single plant can produce kilograms of tasty, juicy fruit in mid to late summer. They are easy to grow, can be grown in the garden or in containers and come in hundreds of modern and heirloom varieties.

Heirloom Tomatoes Variety

Choosing a Tomato Variety

Tomatoes come in a wide variety of colours, shapes and sizes. In fact, there are hundreds if not thousands of different tomatoes you can grow, most of which will taste and look better than those tasteless, watery, polished red globes from the grocery store. While the most popular are the cherry tomatoes and the large slicing beefsteaks, growing your own tomatoes is all about trying something new!

Tomatoes are classified as either Heirloom or Modern varieties. Heirloom varieties are generally older and are open-pollinated. They are grown for historical interest, for saving seeds year after year and for variety. Modern varieties, or hybrids, are generally newer and do not come true from seed.

Growing Tomatoes

Growing Tomatoes

To grow well, Tomatoes need three things. First, lots of sunlight, 6-8 hours a day is preferred. Second, leave some space around each plant to ensure good air circulation. Finally, Tomato plants need lots of water on a regular basis. As we mentioned, tomato plants can be grown in the garden or in a container. When planting in containers, choose a large, deep one as tomatoes seem to prefer it.

Planting Tomatoes

Before planting a tomato, gently remove any branches near the soil, leaving some larger ones higher up. We do this because Tomatoes are one of the few plants that benefit from being planted deeply. Dig a hole that is between 1/3 to ½ the height of your plant. Sprinkle Bonemeal into the hole. This organic fertilizer encourages root growth and fruit development. Put the tomato plant into the hole. Along its main stem are small hairs. When these hairs make contact with soil, new roots will develop. These new roots will give the new tomato plant a great jump start and hopefully produce more fruit. Back fill the hole with soil and pat down to remove air pockets. Water thoroughly.

Tomato Planting

Tomato plants are heavy feeders and will benefit from regular application of fertilizer. Apply an organic or manufactured fertilizer with a high middle number. This nutrient, Phosphorus, encourages the production of roots, flowers and fruits, all of which we need for a good tomato crop. We particularly like Gaia Green and Orgunique products as well as our in-house GardenPro brand.

We plant lots of different types to test them and nothing is worse than forgetting which one was which. Take our advice, if planting more than one variety, take the time to label your plants!

Bush vs Vine Tomatoes

Tomatoes are either determinate or indeterminate. Determinate or bush-form tomatoes are bred to be smaller and have a more controlled growth habit. They stop growing when the terminate or top bud sets fruit. Do not prune these varieties as it may limit the crop size. Indeterminate varieties or vine-type are scrambling, reaching plants that will keep on growing if allowed to. They will continue to grow and set fruit until frost. Vining tomatoes will benefit from staking and/or the use of a tomato cage to keep the plant upright. This will help keep the leaves and foliage from touching the soil.

Water Regularly

Tomatoes require lots of water on a regular basis. Water in the morning and try to avoid getting the leaves wet. Wet leaves can lead to disease and plant health problems. Tomatoes respond well when watered on schedule – try to keep the soil evenly moist. The worst technique is watering irregularly. Stick to a schedule – but don’t allow the plant to dry or become soggy.

Tomato Sucker

Pinch and Prune for More Tomatoes

Refocus the energy of the tomato plant by removing suckers that develop in the crotch joint between two branches. These branches will not bear fruit and take away energy that could otherwise produce more fruit. Avoid excessive pruning or leaf removal as the plant needs the foliage to produce fruit.

Common Tomato Problems

Common Tomato Problems

Blossom End Rot

A very common problem when growing tomatoes is blossom end rot. This disease manifests itself with a large brown soggy spot on the bottom end of the tomato. Throw those tomatoes away as they will not be pleasant to eat. The best way to prevent this issue is to plant your tomatoes with added Calcium. Our GardenPro Tomato Food already includes calcium to help prevent this problem.

Cracked Tomatoes

Tomato cracking occurs because of irregular watering. When over-watered, the tomato will grow faster than the skin can keep up to – resulting in cracks. Cracked tomatoes are still edible, but pick them right away to prevent pests and disease from moving in.

Yellowing Leaves

Yellow leaves on a tomato plant are a symptom of 1 or 2 problems. Either the plant needs nitrogen or it is being over-watered. To solve the problem apply a tomato or all purposed fertilizer and get your watering under control.

Tomato Blossom Die and Fall Off

Tomato Blossom Drop occurs for a variety of reasons. It may be caused by using fertilizers with an excess of Nitrogen, dry windy conditions or temperature variation. Tomatoes are sensitive to temperature when they bloom and set fruit. If the temperature falls below 55F or above 75F at night, or reaches over 90F during the day, the pollen in the flower becomes non-viable and the flower falls off.

My Tomato is Tall and Scraggly

Tomato stems have hairy fibres that when they come in contact with soil will form new roots. If you have a tall, scraggly tomato plant, mound soil around the stem. If you do this, remove any foliage that would come in contact with the soil other than the stem.

At Art's Nursery, we carry a great selection of tomatoes from April through late Summer. Drop by and visit us, pick up a couple and plant them today!


Thursday, April 16, 2015
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Edibles

When it comes to gardening, nothing has been more popular in the past several years than edibles. While vegetables, fruit trees and herbs have always been hot, new varieties have taken over centre stage. Check out these 8 new and unusual edibles for 2015

Brazelberry Pink Icing Blueberry

Brazelberry Pink Icing Blueberry

One of the newest additions to the Brazelberry lineup is ‘Pink Icing’ Blueberry. It features breathtaking spring and fall foliage colours. Springs new growth has varying shades of pink mixed with blue and deeper greens. In the fall and into winter, in mild climates, Pink icing foliage takes on stunning iridescent turquoise blue hues. Very impressive when planted en masse. It is an excellent blueberry for decorative patio pots or for planting into the landscape. Berries are large, sweet and have a robust blueberry flavor.

Pink Icing prefers to be grown in full sun and moist, but well drained acidic soils. Fertilize each spring with a fruit and berry or rhododendron type fertilizer. This variety produces new canes each spring and fruits on the previous years canes. Once fruiting is complete, prune canes that have fruited leaving new canes to fruit the following season. Annual pruning promotes plant growth and berry production. Grows 3-4ft in height with a mounded, slightly spreading habit.

Brazelberry Blueberry Glaze Blueberry

Brazelberry Blueberry Glaze Blueberry

Blueberry Glaze plants are unlike any other blueberries. They have a small stature and incredibly glossy, dark green leaves. They are similar in appearance to boxwood and can also be sheared as such. White with pink spring flowers beautifully contrast the deep green foliage colour. Small dark blue, almost black berries are present in little bundles in mid-summer. Berries have an intense, almost wild blueberry flavor that is packed with anti-oxidants. Super aromatic too! Blueberry Glaze is an interspecific hybrid that is hardy to Zone 5. Add it to your landscape as an accent planting or prune it into an informal hedge. It is also perfect for patio planting in decorative containers.

Blueberry Glaze prefers full sun in moist, but well drained acidic soil. Fertilize each spring with a fruit and berry or rhododendron type fertilizer. Prune the same way as Pink Icing. Grows 2-3ft tall in a compact, bushy mound.

Aloha Berry, Pineberry

Aloha Berry Strawberry / Pineberry

Fragaria ‘Aloha Berry’

The Aloha Berry is a strawberry variety with white-skinned fruit and red seeds.Not only is it interesting looking, it tastes and smells like a cross between pineapples and strawberries! It is also known as a ‘Pineberry’. This variety is self-fertile, ever-bearing and produces fruit from June through the summer.

Grow Aloha berries in the full sun in average to moist soils. Available at Art’s Nursery in mid-to late May.

Goji Berry / Wolfberry

Goji Berry

Goji berries or Wolfberries is the fruit of Lycium barbatum, a plant related to potato, tomato, eggplant and chilli peppers. It is a deciduous, woody, perennial plant that was first cultivated in parts of China up to 600 years ago. More recently discovered in North America by the masses, it has rapidly garnered attention for its nutrient value and anti-oxidant content. Flowers are bright, violet coloured while fruit is bright red an oval in shape. Grows 3-10ft tall and wide. Prefers full sun and moist, but well drained soils. Fertilize in spring before new growth begins. Prune to remove broken of damaged limbs. Extremely cold hardy to zone 3.

Fuyu Persimmon Tree

Fuyu Persimmon Tree

Diospyros kaki 'Fuyu'

Persimmons are deciduous trees that bear large, reddish-yellow fruit with firm sweet flesh. This very ornamental tree has large oval, waxy dark green leaves that fall in autumn exposing attractive edible fruit. Self-fruitful non-astringent variety. Can be eaten fresh – many other varieties require being ripened before eating. Best grown in full sun and moist, but well drained, slightly acidic soil. Grows to 30ft tall and 20ft wide. Harvest in October to November. While hardy in the Pacific Northwest, Persimmons will benefit from some winter protection from cold winds and extreme temperatures.

Ketchup and Fries Grafted Vegetable Plant

Ketchup & Fries Plant

An incredible innovation in vegetable growing. Originally from Thompson & Morgan in the UK, this unique grafted vegetable produces cherry tomatoes on top and potatoes underground. Tomatoes for snacking, salads, sauces or ketchup. Potatoes can be baked, boiled, mashed, roasted or cut for chips or fries. All natural, non-GMO. Grow it in a patio container or in your garden.

It is expected to be available at Art’s Nursery in late May or early June depending on its growth rate.

Cathedral Gem Sausage Vine

Cathedral Gem Sausage Vine

Holboellia coriacea ‘Cathedral Gem’

This durable easy to grow vine has thick, glossy evergreen foliage (in warmer climates) and abundant clusters of white buds that emerge in late winter. They open to highly perfumed pendulous blossoms of cream to dusky mauve. Large pink sausage like edible fruit are displayed in summer. Ideally suited for an arbor or trellis near pathways, patios or garden entrances so the attractive flowers and intoxicating fragrance can be enjoyed up close. Best grown in full to partial shade. Grows vigorously with stems up to 25ft long. Needs winter protection. Hardy in USDA zones 7-10

Dwarf Pomegranate

Dwarf Pomegranate

Punica granatum ‘Nana’

Dwarf Pomegranates are a showy dense deciduous shrub that displays attractive orange-red single flowers at an early age followed by colourful fruit. Excellent for containers or for use in the garden. A wonderful bonsai plant. Needs full sun and moderate watering. Grows 3ft tall and wide. Needs winter protection in our climate. Treat as a tender tropical, hardy in USDA zones 7-11

As always, call ahead, 604.882.1201, to confirm availability, as our selection is always changing and quantities on some varieties may be limited.


Saturday, September 13, 2014
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Edibles

I am new to winter vegetable gardening. This year I’ll be trying a few greens and possibly some radishes in a large container against the south side of the house under the overhang. I have some old glass squares for a bit of a cover if needed. For 10 years I’ve been meaning to do it but I’ve finally got the spot and a few little seedlings all ready to go. I’ll share with you some of the winter veggie garden basics as it really is pretty easy.

Kale | Winter Veggies

Planting Location or Container

Any good draining spot or container that will get 6 or more hours of sun a day. Against a South wall is best if you are planting in a large container or somewhere you will not get too much winter wind. If you do have a windy spot, you can build a wind break with hay bales or bags of fall leaves. Raised beds are ideal especially with our rain. We’ve got one on wheels at the store for you to check out!

For winter protection you can build a low plastic tunnel with pvc piping and poly, or you can use bales of shavings if you are in an area with very wet winters or bales of hay if you are in an area with cold and dryish or snowy winters (wet mouldering hay is not a fun fragrance) and top with old windows or plastic. Basically you can spend many happy hours on Pinterest looking up cold frame or cloche designs and find one that meets your budget and area.

Winter Veggie Guide

What to plant?

There are many wonderful winter vegetable books at your local library, also some great online catalogues. Our awesome catalogue… both online and in the store is the West Coast Seeds Planting Guide for Fall and Winter Harvests. It lists the veggies as well as when to plant, when to transplant and the best part…when to harvest.

Winter Vegetables

When to Plant

Summer is the best time to plant your winter crops such as Broccoli, Cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, Turnips and Cabbage. Your little seedlings need some sun and heat to get started. If you have time in the summer leave a bit of an area clear for your winter crop. If like me, you blinked and your summer was over, there is still time to plant both by seed and seedlings. There is still time for Mesculun Greens, Chives, Cilantro, Radishes and Turnips among others.

Do I fertilize my winter vegetable crop?

Why yes you do! Before planting work some good compost or well rotted manure in to the soil especially if you’ve just pulled out the summer crop. Then you can add a good all-purpose fertilizer to the soil and I like to add some rock phosphate and then get cracking with the planting!

I am really looking forward to this!! I think the veggies will continue at a more sedate pace and I won’t be in too much of a panic over watering in the heat and beating back the weeds. I will also really enjoy those greens on my toasted French bread and fancy cheese - very civilized!!


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Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

We pride ourselves on providing high quality plant, expert advice and an exceptional gardening experience.


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