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Saturday, August 24, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Trees

​​​Hungry for spring, we so often choose our trees: cherries, deciduous magnolias, dogwoods, stewartia based on the show they put on at that time. Or we choose fall colour or winter bark. These are all good choices, but today I just want to make a special plea for two truly great trees Albizia and Magnolia grandiflora.


Walking through the nursery today, I stopped briefly to smell the huge flower of a Magnolia grandiflora sitting at a convenient nose height. Imagine my surprise to find the entire chalice (I assure you there is no better word) packed with bees.


In my own front garden a large Albizia spreads its dappled shade thirty feet high and wide. It is too high for me to notice bees, but butterflies & hummingbirds congregate there all summer.
 


The Albizia needs full sun & good drainage to thrive, but in those conditions, provides the filtered shade most perfect for a patio, or a fishpond. Tropical appearance — hence the common name mimosa or silk tree.  There is now a smaller version 'Summer Chocolate' with foliage that deepens to near chocolate in the summer, adding a wonderful contrast to the rosy pink flowers.


The Magnolia blooms best in full sun, but, preferring more shelter, will still bloom well in a little shade. Unlike the Albizia, it is evergreen & the foliage is extremely handsome, making it a fantastic anchor plant in a garden. It too looks tropical but in a different way, having a fuzzy brown reverse to the leaves which has earned it the nickname 'Teddy-Bear Magnolia.'

Both of these deliciously fragrant, long blooming beauties contribute in their own way to the garden. Bringing an exotic element to your space that adds a great deal of ambience and romance.



Saturday, August 24, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Recipes

Roses love it, vampires fear it.  I have a cushion that advises: anyone who doesn't love cats must have been a rat in a former life. By extension, anyone who doesn't like garlic must have been (or still is...brrr) a vampire. So these recipes are for the rest of us roses. I hope you enjoy them, and don't forget my guiding principle: no recipe EVER called for 3 cloves of garlic that didn't mean 13.

Garlic Broth

Originally from The Vegetarian Epicure, BOOK 2  by Anna Thomas (1978)


8 Cups
2
1 Med Sized
1 Whole

6 Large
1 Large
1.5 Tbsp

-
Pinch
1/4 Tsp
1/2 - 1
1 Sprig
To Taste

 

Water
Carrots
Stock of Celery
Garlic Bulb
Russet Potatoes
Onion
Olive Oil
-
Sage
Dried Thyme
Bay Leaf
Parsely
Salt & Pepper


Let’s Get Started!

First scrub the potatoes very thoroughly and cut away any blemishes, then peel them, cutting off strips at least 1/4 inch thick. Reserve the peeled potatoes for another use. Peel the onion and quarter it. Wash the carrots and celery and slice them. Break the head of garlic up into separate cloves and peel them if you wish, though they can also be used unpeeled--a method that many people feel yields richer flavour.  Combine all the ingredients in a large pot and simmer for about 1 .5  to 2 hours, or until all the vegetables are very soft. If too much water evaporates during the cooking, add enough to keep all the vegetables covered with liquid. When the broth is done, strain everything out through a sieve for a fine, clear, and delicate broth. Finished recipe yields about 6 cups of broth, but this may vary slightly.

NOTE: ONLY ADD A BIT OF SALT AT THE BEGINNING, AS THE STOCK REDUCES IT WILL BECOME MORE SALTY.  CORRECT IT TO TASTE AT THE END.
The most important thing is to taste it, smell it, look at it. If it is light brown, fragrant, and delicious, its ready; if it seems weak, simmer it a bit longer and reduce it; if it seems too strong, add a bit of water. For a clear broth, just strain out all the vegetables through a sieve and correct the seasoning if necessary. For a soup with the consistency of a thin puree, first fish out the celery, garlic, and bay leaf, then press everything through a fine sieve until only a rather pulp is left.



This is another vegeterian Garlic Broth recipe but the finished product retains and sweeter taste due to the addition of sugar and the recipe itself contains fewer ingredients for those of use who like to keep it simple. 
 

Golden Garlic Broth

Originally from Seasonal Soups by Lucy Saunders


6 Whole
3 Tbsp
1 Tbsp
10 Cups

To Taste
 

Garlic Bulbs (50 - 60 Cloves)
Vegetable Oil
Light Brown Sugar (Packed)
Water
Salt & Pepper


Let’s Get Started!

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Separate heads of garlic and remove papery skins; leave each clove whole.  In a deep roasting pan, mix vegetable oil and brown sugar. Toss garlic in the sugar and oil.

Bake for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir cloves often, until garlic is lightly and evenly browned (do not burn).

Remove pan from oven and scrape contents into a stockpot. Cover with water and bring to a simmer over low heat. Simmer for 1 hour or until garlic is soft and stock is a golden color.  Strain stock through a colander, season with salt and pepper, and chill in a tightly sealed container. This stock will keep in the refrigerator for up to 1 month or may be frozen for up to 4 to 6 months. Makes about 6 cups of broth.


Saturday, August 24, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Recipes

As the end of August approaches we strive to make the most of the warm days we have left in the garden. This time of year crops like potatoes, beans, tomatoes and so much more are ripe and are eagerly waiting for us to create delicious dishes to share with friends and family. Here is a recipe I made up myself utilizing one such garden treasure that is only available for a brief period: stalks of dill seed as well as a few other garden goodies.


Golden Beet Borscht


3 Lbs
3 Tbsp
1 Large
4 Cloves

3
1 Stick
2 Large

1 Bunch
6 Cups
1/4 Tsp
1/2 - 1
2
1 Tbsp
To Taste

-
To Finish
2 Big Handfulls
1/2
Top with

 

Golden Beets (about 5 large beets)
Olive OIl
Onion
Garlic
Carrots
Celery
Potatoes
Fresh Dill Stocks
Stock
Dried Thyme
Bay Leaf
Bay Leaves
Peppercorns
Salt & Pepper
-
Optional!
Greens - Shredded (kale, mustard greens, spinach)
Lemon - Juiced
Sour Cream


Let’s Get Started!

Preheat oven to 375F.

Peel & quarter beets, prepare & chop onions, garlic, carrots, potatoes & celery
In a roasting dish, drizzle beets with 2 TBSP of olive oil and sprinkle with salt & pepper.  Roast at 375F for 30-40 minutes, until tender.

In a saucepan over medium heat, saute onion & garlic  in the remaining 1 TBSP of olive oil until golden and softened, about 10 minutes.  Add the celery, carrots, potatoes & sweat over very low heat for 20 minutes or sow


Add roasted beets and dill stems to onions.  Cover with stock, turn the heat up to high, and bring soup to a boil.  Once it comes to a boil, turn the heat to medium-low and let simmer, covered, for ten minutes.

Remove the dill stems from the soup, and add the lemon juice.  Blitz with an immersion blender until smooth.
Add greens, and simmer for five minutes more.

Serve, garnished with a scoop of yogurt and sprinkled with the chopped dill. I like this best with homemade chicken or turkey stock, but have made it for vegetarian friends with garlic stock.  

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Shrubs

​​​Without doubt, macrophylla hydrangeas are very high on any list of most popular summer & fall shrubs in the Pacific Northwest.  Here we offer conditions ideal to keep them in beauty: abundant rainfall in the growing season, acid  soil to keep them the most exquisite blue, with variations possible through treatment, up to and including deepest pink and even variations of colour on the same shrub. Our long falls allow us to enjoy the variation of colour in the flowers as they age. Last, but not least, our mild winters allow us to give them the pruning they like best: having their dried flowers left on all winter, then each sturdy stem cut back to the nearest set of buds.


Not surprisingly, people gardening in colder climates covet hydrangeas for all their manifold beauties, but find it very difficult to provide the conditions they need, a particular difficulty being allowing the stems to stand all winter.  Aware of this demand, breeders have turned their minds to ways to address these difficulties and recent years have seen a number of new strains of macrophylla hydrangeas come onto the market, each addressing the problem in different ways.  While this has expanded opportunities for eastern gardeners it has also greatly enlarged the situations in which we here can grow this wonderful plant.

Perhaps the most exciting is the CityLine strain of hydrangeas.  Blooming, like all macrophyllas on OLD wood, they have been bred to stay very compact: 12-36" wide and tall (for us, undoubtedly closer to the high end).  For gardeners in colder climes, this means they are more easy to protect over the winter (where the plants will likely be smaller).  For us, they still offer a lot for today's smaller gardens and are especially well suited to containers.
 

Cityline Hydrangeas Comparison

Name Description Colour
(Acidic)
Colour
(Alkaline)
Size Blooms On
Berlin Lovely flowers with white centres Blue Pink 1-3 ft Old Wood
Mars Flowers are white edged violet Violet Deep Pink 1-3 ft Old Wood
Paris Reddest of the line, requires aluminum to turn blue Blue Vivid Red 1-2 ft x 2-3 ft Old Wood
Rio Early flowering     Strong Blue Purple 2-3 ft Old Wood
Venice Flowers green with age Blue Hot Pink 1-3 ft Old Wood
Vienna Traditional macrophylla flowers Violet-Blue Pink 1-3 ft Old Wood


Another wonderful line is the Seaside Serenade group, also bred to remain relatively compact.  Named for various sites on the east coast of New England, they are spectacular shrubs with bicolour flowers, and extra thick stems. Additionally, they have been bred to provide interesting fall colour.  They too bloom mostly on OLD wood, although some form new shoots on that wood in the season, which produce more flowers, though smaller.  In colder climates, this means that if the original wood is partly lost to winter, there will still be some flowers.  Here in the lower mainland, we get a first wonderful flush and then a continuation of fresh coloured flowers through the fall.
 

Seaside Serendae Hydrangeas Comparison

Name Description Colour
(Acidic)
Colour
(Alkaline)
Size Blooms On
Cape Cod Each floret has white centre Blue Pink 4 ft Old & New Wood
Cape Lookout Colour changer, huge blooms, great fall foliage Green→ White→ Pink Same 3.5 x 3 ft Old Wood
Cape May Only lacecap (serrata hybrid) of group Blue Pink 2-4 ft Old Wood
Fire Island Flowers are white edged with main colour Deep Blue Deep Pink 3.5 ft Old Wood
Hamptons Two-toned flowers of distinctive colour Intense Blue Intense Pink 3 x 3.5 ft Old Wood



Finally, there is the Endless Summer group, which name has unfortunately given rise to  a myth: that they flower entirely on new wood (like the smooth leaf or Annabelle varieties) and thus can be cut right back, like an Annabelle hydrangea. This is unfortunately not the case.  These hydrangeas (like Seaside Serenade) send out new shoots, which do bloom later in the season. But they form these shoots on OLD wood, the first and largest blooms still arise from the tops of wood formed the previous season. In colder climates, gardeners are advised to mulch them over the winter to preserve that old wood. It obviously takes a lot out of a plant to keep churning out new growth, so increased nourishment is likely to be required as well as intelligent pruning.  
 

Endless Summer Hydrangeas Comparison

Name Description Colour
(Acidic)
Colour
(Alkaline)
Size Blooms On
Bloomstruck Glossy leaves; does bloom on new shoots Violet-Blue Rose-Pink 3-4 x 4-5 ft Old & New Wood
Blushing Bride Soft colours White→ Soft Blue Same 3-6 ft Old & New Wood
Endless Summer First to introduce this tendency Blue Pink 3-4x 4-5 ft Old & New Wood
Summer Crush Intense colour Violet-Blue Raspberry 1.5-3 ft Old & New Wood
Twist & Shout Lacecap with vivid red, sturdy stems Periwinkle Blue Deep Pink 3-5 ft Old & New Wood

 

With so many varieties to choose from, here in the Pacific Northwest we can find a hydrangea for any situation and any taste.  





Tuesday, August 6, 2019
Posted By: Desiree Markewich in Bulbs


With the final days of summer slowly approaching it’s only natural for us gardeners to start planning for next year. The first thing to spring to mind (no pun intended) is fall planting bulbs: Crocus, Tulips, Hyacinth and many more. Often the first sign of colour we are rewarded with in the garden during early spring, planting bulbs in the fall is easy, affordable, and something you must try - if you havent already!

Early Fall (September) is when these flowering beauties start to arrive at the nursery, but we encourage you to Pre-Order early, so you don’t miss out on the 20 stunning new varieties we are recieving this year. 

Early Spring Flowering Bulbs


 
If you want to feel the warm glow of sunshine in early spring, try new varieties Crocus ‘Early Gold’ or Iris ‘Katherine’s Gold’. These yellow cuties are very petite in nature, only growing 4-6 inches tall! This small size makes them perfect for containers or small gardens.
 

Desire something with a bit more colour and size? Try out Narssisus Colourful Companions 'Dancin' in the Sun' combo. An early spring charmer growing to a height of 16 inches and featuring 2 different varieties of white, gold and yellow daffodils.

Mid Spring Flowering Bulbs


For some interest in the garden during mid spring, you can’t go wrong with either Daffodil 'Acropolis' or 'Falmouth Bay'. An elegant almost pure white colour and nice height of 16-20 inches makes this pair stand out among fellow plants gracing the period between spring and summer.

 

The perfect Daffodil (Narcissus) for a patio or smaller garden has to be Narcissus ‘White Petticoat’. Growing to a dimure height of 4 inches, this adorable white daffodil has deep green stems making the crisp white of the blooms even more notable.
 

A featured bulb this year, Tulipa ‘Canadian Liberator’ was released to honour and celebrate 75 years of European Liberation! Canadian Liberator stands tall at 22 inches high and is a strong, bright red, featuring nearly perfect shaped flowers.
 

If you love pink and are looking for some mid spring color we suggest Tulipa ‘Foxtrot’ or Colourful Companions ‘Rasberry Meringue’. Foxtrot is a fragrant, double tulip in a glorious bubblegum pink and Rasberry Meringue combines a creamy white, double daffodil with a matching creamy tulip with raspberry pink accents.

Late Spring


To bring a few splashes of pink to your late spring garden as well, or if enjoy foraging in the garden for cut flower arrangements then you must choose Double Tulip ‘Dazzling Sensation’ or ‘Crispion Sweet’. Crispion Sweet has full, solid pink flowers with fringed petals, while Dazzling Sensation’s blooms are packed with smoother petals with white feathering at the outer petal edges. 
   


Two later Spring flowers that will become a focal point in the garden, and that pollinators can’t miss are Allium ‘Rosy Dream’ and Colourful Companions ‘Hot Shots’. Rosy Dream will grow to 18 inches and feature lovely, globe-like purple blooms, and Hot Shots combines two vivid red tulip varieties that stand at a grand 24 inches tall.


Summer




To get the most out of planting bulbs in the fall you can extend your flowering season into summer by choosing plants such as the Camas or Foxtail Lily. Foxtail Lilies (Eremurus) are extrodinarily tall, perennials that have massive flower spikes. For pink flowers try Eremurus ‘Shelford Pink' or ‘Robustus’ and for orange blooms ‘Cleopatra’. Camassia leichtini ‘Alba’ is an equally tall plant, bearing flower spikes matching the Foxtail Lilies grandeur but in a pale white shade with larger individual flowers upon the spike.   

Garlic

 



If flowers aren’t your thing, or your just enjoy growing your own veggies we suggest planting garlic this fall. Planting garlic is easy, all you have to do is separate each garlic bulb carefully into individual cloves. Plant your cloves in a rich soil by pushing each clove 1-2 inches into the soil with the flat side down and pointed-tip upwards towards the surface of the soil. Your harvest will be ready anytime from Spring through Summer. You will know when the leaves have become mostly yellow, i.e. more yellow on the leaf than there is green. Chesnok, Yugoslavian and Mixed Gourmet varieties are new this year! 

Pre-Order

Any of the bulbs featured in this article. Simply click on the bulb mentioned in the article and it will take you to our pre-order page! 

Pre-Orders end September 1, 2019 when bulbs start to arrive. For availability after September 1 call in store (604) 882 1201.


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Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

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Recent Posts

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Tree Queens of Summer

​​​Hungry for spring, we so often choose our trees: cherries, deciduous magnolias, dogwoods, stewart...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Vegetarian Garlic Broth

Roses love it, vampires fear it. I have a cushion that advises: anyone who doesn't love cats must ha...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Golden Beet Borscht

As the end of August approaches we strive to make the most of the warm days we have left in the gard...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Macrophylla Hydrangeas: In with the New!

Without doubt, macrophylla hydrangeas are very high on any list of most popular summer & fall shrubs...

Tuesday, August 6, 2019
20 New Fall Planting Bulbs for 2019

With the final days of summer slowly approaching it’s only natural for us gardeners to start plannin...

Sunday, August 4, 2019
Fruit Fool

August is upon us and, almost to compensate for this wistful reminder of summers end, we are rewarde...

Sunday, August 4, 2019
Quince & Fig Chutney

The all too brief season of figs will soon be upon us. Fig trees are a treasure of the European gard...

Wednesday, July 24, 2019
The Summer Garden

There is a myth, probably born in heat & nurtured in the longing for shade & leisure, that there “is...


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V4N 3W8

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