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Thursday, October 15, 2015
Posted By: Shelley Levis in Berries

In this video, Shelley Levis introduces you to four of her favourite shrubs that produce colourful berries in Fall. These include: Callicarpa, Aronia 'Autumn Magic', Spring Bouquet Viburnum and Victory Pyracantha

Spring Bouquet Viburnum

Spring Bouquet Viburnum

Viburnum tinus 'Spring Bouquet' (also called 'Compactum')

Spring Bouquet Viburnum is a beautiful evergreen shrub with lightly fragrant, pinkish white flowers. Flowers form striking metallic bluish-purple berries in fall. A dense, compact growth habit makes it a favourite choice for small hedges, screens and foundation plantings. Prefers full to partial sun in moist, but well drained soils. Grows moderately quick to 4-6ft tall and wide. Hardy in USDA zones 7-11

Autumn Magic Chokecherry / Chokeberry

Autumn Magic Chokeberry / Chokecherry

Aronia melanocarpa 'Autumn Magic'

Originally from the University of British Columbia, Autumn Magic Chokeberry is a compact, ornamental shrub with small clusters of white flowers in the spring, followed by purplish-black berries in the fall. The berries are somewhat edible, but quite tart. They are best suited for jams, jellies and baking when combined with other sweeter berries. Foliage turns a brilliant red in the fall. Needs full sun but tolerates extreme cold - it's hardy to zone 3!

Victory Pyracantha / Victory Firethorn

Victory Firethorn / Pyracantha

Pyracantha koidzumii  'Victory'

Victory Firethorn, or Pyracantha as it is also known is a great deer resistant barrier shrub for the garden. Masses of white spring flowers turn into colourful orange berries that attract birds in the fall. It is easy to grow and waterwise for added benefit. Prefers full sun and is hardy in zones 7-9. Grows 8-10ft tall and 6-8ft wide.

Profusion Beautyberry

Profusion Beauty Berry Shrub

Callicarpa bodinieri 'Profusion'

Beauty Berry gets its name from the masses of metallic purple berries that cover its foliage in fall and winter. It is a superb deciduous shrub with green foliage that has an exciting bronze tinge when new. Small purplish flowers appear in summer amongst the large green leaves. Prune in late winter to early spring to encourage new growth. Prefers full sun. Grows to 6-10ft high and wide. Hardy in USDA zones 5-8.

Two More Plants That Didn't Make The Video!

As we tried our best to keep the video short, these two plants were not included, but are still great fall berry producing plants.

Wintergreen

Wintergreen

Gaultheria procumbens

This groundcover evergreen plant forms low mounds of dark green foliage, often with a reddish hue.. White waxy, urn-shaped flowers are borne in the late spring to early summer and are followed by round red fruits. Fruits are 'somewhat' edible. they have a striking wintergreen - peppermint like flavour, but are very pithy and bland. Wintergreen is an excellent plant for acidic soils and partial sun or shade. Grows up to 12 inches in height and 3ft across.

Red Beauty Holly

Red Beauty Holly

Ilex x 'Rutzan'

Red Beauty Holly delivers abundant crops of bright red berries combined with dense, deep green, evergreen spiny foliage. Tiny white flowers emerge in spring. It is excellent as a specimen or in an informal hedge. Use for framing an entrance or lining a drive. Maintains a dense form with little or no pruning. Red Beauty forms a dense, upright conical form 7-10ft tall and 4-5ft wide. Needs full to part sun and regular watering. Hardy in USDA zones 6-10.

If you have any questions about these plants, or want to add them to your garden, drop by Art's Nursery, or give us a call at 604.882.1201. We'd be happy to assist you! As always, call ahead to confirm availability as our selection is always changing.


Thursday, April 18, 2013
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Fruit Trees

One of the exciting new edibles I’ve added to my collection is the University of Saskatchewan’s Bush Cherry.  They’ve crossed a Sour Cherry with a Mongolian Cherry and have come up with a variety of new smaller, very hardy tart-sweet bush cherries.

Dwarf Sour Cherry Varieties

Photo Courtesy: GoodFruit.Com

Now hybridizing is not new, and it is not genetic modification.  It is a patience and time eating task involving pollinating the flower of one cherry cultivar or variety with the flower of another cherry variety and then planting the seeds of those cherries and waiting to see how they fruit and then testing hardiness and growth habit.  Cross pollination occurs in nature…in fact, that is how we can come up with 7000 plus apple varieties.

So the University of Saskatchewan has come up with a smaller bushier hardy cherry like its Mongolian relative (prunus fruiticosa) with all the tartness of a Montmorency pie cherry and all the sugars of a Bing.  Well done U of Sask!

They are relatively trouble free shrubs which thrive in full sun (or at least 6 hours of it to produce the best sugars) in an average well drained soil.  They can be planted in containers.  They are said to be self fruitful though most likely benefit from having a second different variety around.

They have white single blossoms in the spring and fruit in July.  The longer the cherries hang on the shrubs, the higher the brix, or sugar.  The cherries will not drop like a Bing, they will hang on the shrub and will even dry if you leave them long enough. These cherries are great fresh and fantastic dried or in pies or preserves.  They are high in vitamin C and Vitamin A as well as anthocyanins which help to reduce inflammation.   The smaller shrub size makes it less attractive to the birds and easier to net if needed.  There are several notable varieties each with its one unique characteristics.

Carmine Jewel Dwarf CherryCarmine Jewel Dwarf Cherry Crimson Passion Dwarf CherryCrimson Passion Dwarf Cherry
Cupid Dwarf CherryCupid Dwarf Cherry Juliet Dwarf CherryJuliet Dwarf Cherry
Romeo Dwarf CherryRomeo Dwarf Cherry Valentine Dwarf CherryValentine Dwarf Cherry

Photos Courtesy: University of Saskatchewan

Carmine Jewel – Zone 2-8.  This shrub produces almost black red berries in mid- July.  They are great in pies, preserves, juices and dried.  It is a tarter cherry but many do love it fresh.  It is the earliest producer.

Crimson Passion – Zone3-8.  This shrub produces dark red berries late July early August.  It is the sweetest of all bush cherries with a whopping 22brix.  Crimson Passion does not sucker and is a slower grower very well suited to pot culture.

Romeo – Zones 3-8.  Romeo produces a dark black red sweet/sour cherry.  It is one of the largest and best for producing juice.  It is later than Carmine Jewel.  It is great for fresh eating as well.

 Juliet – Zones 2-8.   Juliet produces a dark red cherry.  Very good for eating fresh out of hand as well as for making pies, juice and jams.  It had very high sugars and is a very productive bush.  The pits are large enough to use a crank pit remover if you are making pies.

Valentine – Zones 2-8.  Valentine produces a scarlet red tart cherry.  The red colour holds in pies and no dye is necessary. It is also great in juice.  It is very productive.

Cupid – Zones 2-8.  Cupid produces the largest of the cherries and blooms 1 week later than the others.  It has great balanced sweet tart flavour for fresh eating, jams and juicing.

I have a number of these in my yard and have had the chance to taste a cherry or two from the bushes.  They have a tangy flavour that I adore.  I look forward to them producing more and comparing the flavours.   This is very exciting for me because I don’t really have space for a larger cherry tree.

 

More information about the Dwarf Cherry Program is available from:

 

 

We have limited stock available from last year (older plants), but a number of varieties have been potted at Art's Nursery and they should be ready for sale by June.  You can put your name on our customer request list (call 604.882.1201) and we will contact you as soon as the little guys are ready for their new homes!


Thursday, February 9, 2012
Posted By: Lyle Courtice A.H. in Winter Gardens

Even in winter the garden can hold some interesting surprises, here are just a few plants that break with tradition and offer us a splendid display when all else is the garden is asleep.

Paperbark Maple

PAPERBARK MAPLE
Acer griseum

Few trees can surpass this maple in its simple architectural beauty and being one of my favorites it always finds a place in my garden. In winter it's peeling cinnamon coloured bark is visually stunning and draws the eye.

In spring through summer it's small trifoliate leaves of dark bluish green make the perfect backdrop with fall bringing a rugged display of deep reds and brown. A compact and fairly slow growing tree it lends itself well to our smaller urban gardens. Acer griseum prefers full sun to light shade on well-drained soil. Height: 6-9m Spread: 3-6m Zone: 4

Japanese Camellias, Sasanqua Camellias

JAPANESE CAMELLIA
Camellia spp.

A broadleaf evergreen for our milder West coast climate, camellias come in a nice range of shapes, sizes and flower colour. The more common Camellia japonica are large shrubs or small trees with a dense canopy of lustrous dark green leaves which make an excellent foil for plants with lighter or variegated foliage.

Flowering can start from December and continue into March, the large flowers can be single, semi-double or double and range from white to yellow (rare) and shades of pink and red. You can even find those that have multicoloured or fragrant flowers which further adds to their appeal.

Other species available include; Camellia sasanqua the Christmas Camellia which blooms in late fall or early winter with smaller single flowers and Camellia sinensis the famous Tea Plant (tea is made from this plant!) with small single flowers late summer into fall.

Camellia's like to grow in partial shade but will tolerate full sun and as usual should be grown in soil with proper drainage. Most types can be easily trimmed to keep them in check. Height: 1-5m Spread: 1-4m Zone: 7

Cornus mas, Cornelian Cherry TreeCORNELIAN CHERRY, DOGWOOD
Cornus mas

A highly adaptable and relatively trouble free plant it should be used far more in our urban landscapes. It can be kept as a large foundation or border shrub but is probably best suited as a small tree. Late winter into early spring marks the arrival of its bright yellow flowers which appear in small clusters along the stems, an additional display of edible bright cherry-red fruit in summer is a bonus. The bark on older stems exfoliates in flaky patches and can be rather attractive, leaves are glossy dark green; reddish-purple in fall. Cornus mas likes full sun or light shade and is best grown on well-drained soil. Height: 6-8m Spread: 4-6m Zone: 4

Harry Lauders Walking Stick

CORKSCREW HAZEL / HARRY LAUDERS WALKING STICK
Corylus avellana 'Contorta'

A shrub that shines in winter after shedding its cloak of crumpled dark green leaves in a display of yellow fall colour. Its bare stems have long been used in floriculture and ikebana with their curling and twisted habit they create an intertwining maze which captives the eye and lends a unique structural presence to the garden. For those who crave added interest there is a reddish-purple leaf form available called 'Red Majestic'. Hazel grow their best in full sun. Pictured below are the long yellow male catkins which appear at the beginning of the spring season. Height: 4m Spread: 3-4m Zone: 4

Witchhazel

WITCHHAZEL
Hamamelis x intermedia var.

A staple for any winter scene the witch-hazel opens a window to the coming spring with a whiff of fragrance thrown in. Often grown as a large shrub, but can be found as a standard tree it has a wide spreading rounded crown with medium to dark green leaves and stunning fall colours of yellow to orange and red. However late winter is when we really notice the witch-hazel and often without even seeing it first.

Along its branches small clusters of flowers unfurl their wispy twisted petals which are accompanied by a sweet scent that carries through the garden; colour ranges from yellow to red. A spectacular plant that should make its way into more gardens. Height: 4-7m Spread: 3-6m Zone: 5

All of these trees and many more are available at Art's Nursery. Please visit or call us at 604.882.1201 for more information.


Saturday, April 16, 2011
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Trees

Kwanzan Flowering CherryIn honor of the Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival which runs from March 26 until April 22, I thought I’d remind you of one of the trees that we in the Lower Mainland tend to take for granted – the flowering cherry. 

This tree literally explodes onto the scene with delicate blossoms of whites and varying shades of pink. 

When it does, Vancouverites breathe a sigh of relief – spring is indeed here. 

April showers are followed shortly by ‘Pink Snow’ as the blossoms gently break apart and are carried by the breeze to dot the landscape with blossom confetti.  For a short time, it is pure magic.  It was this absolutely breathtaking beauty that lead to the eventual crash in popularity. 

For a time, the flowering cherry was the municipal street tree of choice.  It was planted everywhere.  It was the ‘bellybutton’ of trees -  everyone had one.   Crowed close to driveways and imprisoned by sidewalks they heaved the concrete when they stretched out their roots.  Hacked into obnoxious ‘lollypop’ shapes by inexperienced pruners, overcrowed and underfed, swimming in poorly drained garden beds they developed a myriad of problems.  

Municipalities began ripping them out and replacing them to stave off furthflowering cherry treeer headaches.  People began avoiding them. 

A classic case of the right tree in the wrong place!!

The flowering cherry in the right place is a spectacular tree. 

Give this beauty the room to stretch out, a well drained planting site and an open and airy spot and you will be graciously rewarded. 

To help avoid many cherry problems, rake and bag the leaves in the fall and have your tree pruned by a professional Arborist. 

Rule number one of tree care…it’s better to not prune at all than to prune incorrectly!  

With the cherry, the roots are part of the beauty of the tree.  To see drifts of blue flowered Brunnera and sunshine yellow daffodils nestled into the folds of the powerful looking roots in one of my favorite sections of VanDusen gardens in something I always try to see in the spring. 

After a long wet winter and in between the rain showers you owe it to yourself to drink in as much of this west coast sight as you can – it only lasts for a short time.  If you have the spot, you might like to try one of your own. 

Some of our favourites include:


Kwanzan Flowering Cherry

Kwanzan Flowering Cherry


Mt Fuji Flowering Cherry

Mt Fuji Flowering Cherry


Akebono Flowering Cherry

Akebono Flowering Cherry


Amanogawa Columnar Flowering Cherry

Amanogawa Columnar Flowering Cherry

This year, if you are lucky enough to get to gaze up into the canopy of a Japanese flowering cherry tree, give thanks to our neighbours to the west who gifted us these beauties in the early 30’s .  Our original cherry trees were given to us by the mayors of Kobe and Yokohama to honor those Japanese Canadian soldiers who served in WW1.  

I am grateful for these lovely trees. 

I have been thinking our neighbours in Japan a lot these past weeks and my heart is with you as you try to heal and rebuild.   I shall leave you with a Haiku:

my glasses fog up

I slowly sip my hot tea

rain  pelts the window





This Post Was Written By:

Laurelle O.

Art's Nursery Ltd.


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Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

We pride ourselves on providing high quality plant, expert advice and an exceptional gardening experience.

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