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Saturday, August 24, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Shrubs

​​​Without doubt, macrophylla hydrangeas are very high on any list of most popular summer & fall shrubs in the Pacific Northwest.  Here we offer conditions ideal to keep them in beauty: abundant rainfall in the growing season, acid  soil to keep them the most exquisite blue, with variations possible through treatment, up to and including deepest pink and even variations of colour on the same shrub. Our long falls allow us to enjoy the variation of colour in the flowers as they age. Last, but not least, our mild winters allow us to give them the pruning they like best: having their dried flowers left on all winter, then each sturdy stem cut back to the nearest set of buds.


Not surprisingly, people gardening in colder climates covet hydrangeas for all their manifold beauties, but find it very difficult to provide the conditions they need, a particular difficulty being allowing the stems to stand all winter.  Aware of this demand, breeders have turned their minds to ways to address these difficulties and recent years have seen a number of new strains of macrophylla hydrangeas come onto the market, each addressing the problem in different ways.  While this has expanded opportunities for eastern gardeners it has also greatly enlarged the situations in which we here can grow this wonderful plant.

Perhaps the most exciting is the CityLine strain of hydrangeas.  Blooming, like all macrophyllas on OLD wood, they have been bred to stay very compact: 12-36" wide and tall (for us, undoubtedly closer to the high end).  For gardeners in colder climes, this means they are more easy to protect over the winter (where the plants will likely be smaller).  For us, they still offer a lot for today's smaller gardens and are especially well suited to containers.
 

Cityline Hydrangea Comparison

Variety
Name
Bloom
Desc.
Colour
(Acidic)
Colour
(Alkaline)
Size Blooms On
'Berlin' Lovely flowers with white centres Blue Pink 1-3 ft Old Wood
'Mars' Flowers are white edged violet Violet Deep Pink 1-3 ft Old Wood
'Paris' Reddest of the line, requires aluminum to turn blue Blue Vivid Red 1-2 ft x 2-3 ft Old Wood
'Rio' Early flowering     Strong Blue Purple 2-3 ft Old Wood
'Venice' Flowers green with age Blue Hot Pink 1-3 ft Old Wood
'Vienna' Traditional macrophylla flowers Violet - Blue Pink 1-3 ft Old Wood
Find out more about thie Cityline series on Proven WInner's Website.


Another wonderful line is the Seaside Serenade group, also bred to remain relatively compact.  Named for various sites on the east coast of New England, they are spectacular shrubs with bicolour flowers, and extra thick stems. Additionally, they have been bred to provide interesting fall colour.  They too bloom mostly on OLD wood, although some form new shoots on that wood in the season, which produce more flowers, though smaller.  In colder climates, this means that if the original wood is partly lost to winter, there will still be some flowers.  Here in the lower mainland, we get a first wonderful flush and then a continuation of fresh coloured flowers through the fall.
 

Seaside Serendae Hydrangea Comparison

Variety
Name
Bloom
Desc.
Colour
(Acidic)
Colour
(Alkaline)
Size Blooms On
'Cape Cod' Each floret has white centre Blue Pink 4 ft Old & New Wood
'Cape Lookout' Colour changer, huge blooms, great fall foliage Green→ White→ Pink Same 3.5 x 3 ft Old Wood
'Cape May' Only lacecap (serrata hybrid) of group Blue Pink 2-4 ft Old Wood
'Fire Island' Flowers are white edged with main colour Deep Blue Deep Pink 3.5 ft Old Wood
'Hamptons' Two-toned flowers of distinctive colour Intense Blue Intense Pink 3 x 3.5 ft Old Wood
Find out more about the Seaside Seranade series on Monrovia's Website.



Finally, there is the Endless Summer group, which name has unfortunately given rise to  a myth: that they flower entirely on new wood (like the smooth leaf or Annabelle varieties) and thus can be cut right back, like an Annabelle hydrangea. This is unfortunately not the case.  These hydrangeas (like Seaside Serenade) send out new shoots, which do bloom later in the season. But they form these shoots on OLD wood, the first and largest blooms still arise from the tops of wood formed the previous season. In colder climates, gardeners are advised to mulch them over the winter to preserve that old wood. It obviously takes a lot out of a plant to keep churning out new growth, so increased nourishment is likely to be required as well as intelligent pruning.  
 

Endless Summer Hydrangea Comparison

Variety
Name
Bloom
​​​​​​​Desc.
Colour
(Acidic)
Colour
(Alkaline)
Size Blooms On
'Bloomstruck' Glossy leaves; does bloom on new shoots Violet - Blue Rose - Pink 3-4 x 4-5 ft Old & New Wood
'Blushing Bride' Soft colours White→ Soft Blue Same 3-6 ft Old & New Wood
'Endless Summer' First to introduce this tendency Blue Pink 3-4x 4-5 ft Old & New Wood
'Summer Crush' Intense colour Violet - Blue Raspberry 1.5-3 ft Old & New Wood
'Twist & Shout' Lacecap with vivid red, sturdy stems Periwinkle Blue Deep Pink 3-5 ft Old & New Wood

Find out more about the Endless Summer series on the Endless Summer Website.

With so many varieties to choose from, here in the Pacific Northwest we can find a hydrangea for any situation and any taste.  





Thursday, June 20, 2019
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Shrubs

Hydrangeas are a lovely and diverse genus, many of which have become essential parts of our garden vocabulary.
Hydrangea Group

Most of us are familiar with the "old fashioned hydrangea": hydrangea macrophylla, and mostly with it in its round headed (mob-cap) form. In England, this variety is called "mob-cap" after the rounded cap worn indoors by married women in the late 18th/early 19th century. Here in North America, they are more usually called mop heads. Having grown up in an English tradition, I found this very odd at first!!
Hydrangea Mophead

This shrub has a lot going for it: it flowers for a very long time starting in the summer when few shrubs but roses are in bloom. Unlike the rose it is equally happy in sun and in shade, though it requires more water in full sun. And, also unlike the rose, it needs no deadheading or summer pruning; the round flowers of macrophylla are lovely from the time they first appear, often in strange shades of ivory & green, slowly deepening to their ultimate colours of blue or pink, and then, as fall approaches, evolving into yet stranger colours of violet, burgundy, wine and tan. These flowers dry well, and, if you like, can be sprayed with gold for Christmas decoration!
Lacecap Hydrangea

As well as mobcaps, hydrangea macrophylla has a lacecap form. Like the dogwood, what appears to be a flower is actually a bract surrounding the true flower, which is comparatively insignificant. In the mobcap above, the bulk of the flower is made of infertile bracts. In the lacecap, the centre of the flower is made up of tiny fertile flowers with a surrounding circle of bracts, looking much like a lace doily, or old fashioned lace cap, hence the name. These plants are generally more open and graceful in appearance than the mobcaps, but have many of the same attributes.

Both kinds of hydrangeas serve a good purpose in garden design. They fit very well with rhododendrons, liking the same conditions of soil and sun, and adding garden colour at a time when rhododendrons are long over. The lacecap is particularly nice here, its grace contrasting with the bulkier shape of rhododendrons. They fit equally well with the long blooming summer & fall perennials, adding some restful substance to the border.

Pannicle Hydrangea

In addition to these two forms of H. macrophylla, hydrangea paniculata (Peegee) is a treasured garden plant. Instead of a dome, the flowers form a cone, initially white (or green) deepening to rosy red and ultimately burgundy in a way reminiscent of macrophylla, but more striking because of the size of the flower. The plant too is larger with quite a different garden effect, with strong wands growing upwards. Often grown as a standard (("tree form") it makes a terrific central feature in a frontal bed.

Macrophylla in both its forms and paniculata are those most often encountered in gardens; but there are many others: hydrangea arborescens Annabelle (a very hardy form, blooming on new wood), hydrangea quercifolia (oakleaf hydrangea - very handsome in woodland), hydrangea aspera (extraordinarily shade tolerant) and of course, the climbing hydrangea: hydrangea petiolaris). These are all excellent plants but more suited to a wilder sort of garden than macrophylla and paniculata.

Some well established favourites:
 

Macrophylla : first the mobcaps

Sister Theresa pure white, each flower with a pale blue eye
Nikko Blue very large turquoise, a bit floppy, but gorgeous in acid soil
Glowing Embers reliably red in any soil

Lovely Lacecaps

Blaumeise (Teller Blue) blue turning brilliant pink in basic (alkaline) soil
Kardinal (Teller Red) rich deep pink turning purple in acid soil
Libelle (Teller White) white with deep blue centre which centre turns pink in basic soil

Paniculatas

Paniculata Grandiflora (the original PeeGee) pure white flowers aging rosy pink
Limelight soft green aging to pink
Brussels Lace a rare form with flowers like a lacecap white with no colour change
Quickfire white flowers turning pinkish red
 

For more information about growing Hydrangeas, read the Learn to Grow Hydrangeas Blog Post
If you're interested in any of these beautiful Hydrangeas, drop by the nursery and check out our collection. As always the selection and availability is always changing so call ahead if you're making a special trip


Sunday, March 31, 2019
Posted By: Diane Scott in Roses
Rosa 'Diane Loomer'
This year we were lucky enough to acquire four very special roses from acclaimed local rose hybridizer, Brad Jalbert of Select Roses. While many of his varieties are now available around the globe, only a few local retail nurseries have been offered the honour of carrying Brad’s roses.
Rosa 'Diane Loomer' 
Among these exceptional bushes is the rose ‘Diane Loomer’. Named for the first woman to conduct the National Youth Choir of Canada, Diane Loomer was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in 1999. This hybrid tea rose has an upright growth of 3-4 feet with large fragrant blooms (4-5 inches) that change from golden to apricot prink. This amazing rose is a continual bloomer from spring to fall.
Rosa 'Dylan'
Our second and newest Select rose is called ‘Dylan’. With blooms of the softest pink, this compact floribunda rose grows to about 3 feet tall. Easy to grow with foliage that has exceptional resistance to disease. Endless, long-lasting blooms on strong stems will enhance your garden all summer long. These would do well in all landscapes from mass plantings to a single container on your deck.
Rosa 'Our Anniversary'
Planted in Stanley Park and various parks in around Surrey, ‘Our Anniversary’ is truly a rose for the lower mainland. With blooms starting plum red deepening to a deep plum purple (weather dependent), this dense bushy floribunda has spectacular glossy green foliage and a light, sweet fragrance. Its disease resistance in all climates makes it popular around the world. Growing to approximately 2.5 feet tall, this rose would be great in containers.

The fourth offering is the ‘Vogue Anniversary’ rose. After looking at many options, Vogue magazine chose this bushy dwarf floribunda to honour its 125 anniversary. An English style rose with golden peach blooms and bright green foliage, it has great resistance to black spot and mildew. A fragrant compact rose, it would work well in a border garden, in smaller gardens or in a pot on the deck. 

Start feeding your roses this year with Select Roses plant food. We have both the Rose food and the Rose Starter food. Both are slow release. This means you can use them for your spring and summer rose feeding. Apply fertilizer in the spring when the soil, as well as the air, is warm, usually about mid April (this means temperatures stay above 10˚ C at night). Re-apply in mid June just after the first blooms. 
Rosa 'Dylan'
The rose food has an N-P-K ratio of 21-9-15, organic based with traces of micro nutrients for a perfectly balanced rose food. This one is preferred by the Vancouver Rose Society. The Rose Starter (N-P-K ratios of 1-3-15) is balanced for better root development and more blooms in the first year. It works well as an all purpose for your other plantings as well. We are offering both in the smaller container, the one with the hand grip for ease of use, at $14.98.

All four roses will be available in 3 gallon pots for pre-order on our website with pickup at the beginning of May.

For more information abour Brad Jalbert and his roses visit his website www.selectroses.ca


 

Tuesday, November 6, 2018
Posted By: Arts Nursery Staff in Conifers

Our world can change so quickly. We move into our first home with its tiny yard. We leave a larger home with a large yard that we have loved, for a smaller home with a smaller yard that we will love just as much. There just isn’t room for that 20’- 30’ tree or that large mugo pine. But, what hasn’t changed is our desire to enjoy our yards whether looking through a window, or enjoying a day outside.

It is often our sanctuary, no matter the size. It brings us joy, or perhaps provides us with quiet solitude. We create a lifetime of new memories in it. That is a tall order for a small yard, but one the nursery industry has recognized. The list of semi-dwarf and true dwarf evergreens and deciduous trees is growing at such a fast pace. The choices are absolutely amazing, but as the selection has grown, making the right choices has become difficult at times. No matter the size of your garden, it is still too easy to buy a plant because you just love it only to find that it outgrows its space, or just doesn’t fit. I am quite sure most of us can identify with this experience. So, I want to share with you a selection of my all-time favorites. Plants that I know stand the test of time and provide easy care for years.

Let’s start with three very different and equally beautiful deciduous trees. Let me assure you though, there are so many more to choose from at the nursery.

Full Moon Maple in Container

Acer japonicum 'Full Moon'

One of my favorites is Acer japonicum 'Full Moon'. Although this picture shows what an outstanding container plant it is, it does equally well in the garden. This is an award winning tree, and for good reason. The tree naturally has an upright, densely branched form. The leaves are strikingly shaped, having 7-11 lobes. It thrives in part shade to shade and will require little to no pruning due to its natural eye-catching form. It is a very slow growing tree, taking years to reach 8’-10’. Another important attribute is its incredible fall color, turning the most amazing shades of red with the display lasting for weeks as this treasure holds on to its leaves long into the fall.

Zone – Hardy to Zone 5

Water needs – Even moisture

Sun requirements – morning sun, afternoon shade, will tolerate full sun with enough moisture, but watch for leaf burn

Height and Width 10’. Given the decades it needs, it can reach a maximum of 20ft high and 12ft wide

Cornus Kousa Wolf Eyes
Cornus Kousa Wolf Eyes

Cornus kousa 'Wolf Eyes'

Cornus Kousa 'Wolf Eyes' has been growing in my garden now for at least 15 years. I have watched it survive, flooding, drought, freezing rain, snow load, extreme heat….the list goes on. It is a true champion and comes through everything nature can throw at it just as spectacularly as the year before. This is a reliable variegated form of Dogwood, now standing at 8 feet high and about six feet wide. I absolutely love this tree. While reversion to green for variegated plants can be an issue … not so with this beauty. Once it finishes flowering, the green leaves accented with ivory along their edges make this tree shine like a beacon in the summer. It handles morning sun and loves even moisture. It takes on a unique pink and scarlet fall color. Its wavy leaves show this tree to its maximum beauty year round.

Zone – Hardy to Zone 5

Water needs – even moisture

Sun requirements – morning sun and afternoon shade but tolerant of full sun

Height and Width to date (15 years) – 8ft high by 6ft wide

Plant with – picea abies pendula – one shaped to keep a low profile

Acer palmatum Twombleys Red Sentinel

Acer palmatum 'Twomblys Red Sentinel'

Acer palmatum Twombly’s Red Sentinel has quickly weaved its way into the hearts of not just the lovers of Japaneses Maples, but the public in general. Who would not love the look of those gorgeous larger red Japanese Maples in a compact, but equally stunning form? It has all the characteristics that you have come to expect from a maple . . . the rich burgundy foliage in the spring to the scarlet red foliage in the late fall and all the other expectations in between. While its overall size is much smaller, it will not make you wait long to be able to appreciate its addition to your garden.

Zone – Hardy to Zone 5

Water needs – Average moisture

Sun requirements – Part sun to full sun Size – 10ft -12ft high 5ft-6ft wide

Plant with – goes with almost every plant in your garden. Try weeping long needled white pines

Pinus mugo Carstens Winter Gold
Pinus mugo Carstens Winter Gold Fall Colour

Pinus mugo 'Carstens Wintergold'

Pinus mugo Carsten’s Wintergold – Pines have been a staple of gardens for decades and are a passion for me, as they are so varied in size, shape, and color. They seem to withstand almost any condition other than deep shade and are considered somewhat drought hardy once established. They are also not picky about soil, growing in almost any medium but very heavy wet clay. There is literally a pine for almost every corner of the garden, large or small. However, none stands out for versatility as much as this little gem. This shrub is considered by many to be one of the best winter gold pines available. If you are shopping in the late spring or summer look for a deep medium green shrub. If you are shopping in the fall, look for a butter yellow shrub with green hues deep in the center. It is almost magical to watch it warming into a butter yellow for the winter year after year. It is a true dwarf in that it puts on less that two inches of growth per year. The shrubs shown in these photos are 8 years old now and have never been pruned.

Zone – Hardy to Zone 2

Water needs – Average to light moisture once stablished

Sun requirements – Full sun for best color

Size – 18in-24in high 18in-24in wide

Plant with or near – picea procumbens glauca pendula
Chamaecyparis obtusa Nana Gracilis

Chamaecyparis obtusa nana gracilis

Chaemcyparis obtusa nana gracillis is another award winning plant pick. It has been gracing our gardens for over 150 years, adding a naturally sculpted look without a pruner ever touching it. It has dark green foliage with a fan-like layered look, putting on growth in an irregular but eye-catching manner. There is little to say about this treasure as it speaks for itself once you see it. There are several different cultivars that have varied applications for your garden. This is an easy choice for the smaller yard. Bu,t look for this plant in gold hues too – known as Chaemcyparis obtusa nana gracillis aurea.

Zone – Hardy to Zone 5

Water needs – Average to light moisture once stablished

Sun requirements – Full sun to part shade

Size –6ft high 4ft wide

Plant with – weeping burgundy Japanese maple

Nandina domestica Gulf Stream

Nandina domestica 'Gulf Stream'

Nandina domestica Gulf Stream is not what you typically think of when you mention evergreen shrubs, but it is in a class all its own. Also known as false bamboo, please do not let the nickname fool you. It is nothing like the running bamboos many of us picture. It isn’t even in the same family. It is only due to the look of the foliage that it has acquired this misnomer! This is truly one of the most versatile and beautiful evergreen shrubs to have in your garden, with leaf color ranging from bluish-greens, oranges, golds, to reds, and bronze. This is a tough little plant, going so far as to be planted en masse in city boulevards. But it is just at home in your garden. It also makes a great addition to your winter container planting.

Zone – Hardy to Zone 6
Water needs – Drought tolerant once established

Sun requirements – Full sun to light or open shade

Size –3ft high 3ft wide

Plant with – Juniper Bluestar or Pinus Slowmound

As always, call ahead if you are interested in any of these plants as our selection is always changing!


Sunday, March 4, 2018

Dormant Oil Spray

Protect Your Fruit Trees from Insect Damage & Fungus

Spring is on its way, and now is the last chance to protect your trees by applying dormant oil spray and lime Sulphur BEFORE bud break. Combat disease and pesky insects such as scale, mites, and leafrollers in one easy step by using this spray kit on fruit trees, deciduous shrubs, and ornamentals. Do not spray on evergreens.

If you’re only going to apply one treatment this year to protect your fruit trees and keep your garden clean - this is it! To learn more about this product, continue reading below...

Dormant Oil Spray Kit


What is Dormant Oil Spray?
Dormant oil spray is available in a kit that contains a lime sulphur and horticultural oil that are combined together to kill over-wintering insects (such as scale, mites, and leafrollers) and control disease & fungus. The oil suffocates insects and their eggs nesting in branches. It’s the best preventative measure you can take by cutting off most of the insect population to protect your trees from damage.


When to Apply
Use dormant oil with lime sulphur any time during winter when temperatures are above freezing. Plants need to be dormant - apply before spring buds begin to open.
 
  • Use on fruit and other deciduous trees, shrubs, and ornamentals
  • DO NOT apply to evergreens, beeches, Japanese Maple trees, or Colorado Blue Spruce


How to Use
For proper mixing instructions and safety precautions, always follow the directions according to the package.
  • Once mixed, the easiest method to apply is by using a pressurized sprayer or a specific applicator that attaches to your garden hose.
  • Mix only what you can use, as you cannot save the prepared solution for later use. Always wear protective clothing and goggles when spraying any garden pesticide.
  • ONLY apply when the plant is completely dormant (no signs of growth)
  • Start spraying at the top of the plant until it just starts to bead off the branches, and then work your way down. Spray around the base of your tree or bush. The spray will be more efficient on a day without wind, and dry days are best.

Dormant oil spray is the best protective treatment to help kill over-wintering insects, eggs, and fungal spores from your deciduous trees, shrubs, and ornamentals. This is the most beneficial treatment to apply to your fruit trees, and NOW is the time to do it - before new spring growth starts to appear!

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Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

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