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Thursday, August 20, 2015
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Gardening

As we move into the lazy hazy days of August I can’t help thinking that I haven’t even scratched the surface of my own summer to-do list. Aaack... I not only have people and places that I haven’t had a chance to visit yet but I have painting, editing and sorting that I haven’t even put a small dent in.

So much for the lazy part, though I have had my eye on one of those hammock chairs…I tried one out and it is just perfect for reading…which is just one more thing I haven’t had a chance to do much of this summer. Actually when you think of it…those are not too terribly bad as far as problems go eh? Here is YOUR list… I’ve got my own.

Summer Lawns

Lawns

At stage 3 water restrictions there is not much to do. But there are a few more things that you want to try to avoid if you can, like heavy traffic, compacting, fertilizing and or spraying chemicals on your dormant lawn. If you really miss the green, you can buy a non-toxic green lawn spray paint. You can also use "gray-water". Think lightly used bathtub water or cleanish-water after the dishes. However, stay away from using heavily contaminated or soaped-up water in your lawn or plants.

Trees and Shrubs

You can still hand water trees and shrubs. Now is also a good time to do a little bit of thinning on fruit trees, Japanese Maples and Birch Trees if needed, as well as vines, of course. Remember to use proper pruning techniques and to remove branches no bigger than your thumb in thickness. Also follow the never more than 1/3 of the tree rule though I would adjust that to ¼ of the tree or shrub at this time for summer pruning.

Summer Pruning

Remember you do summer pruning to slow the growth of your tree or shrub while winter pruning invigorates growth. So if you have a young tree that you want to encourage growth, do not prune at this time. If you have an old fruit tree, vine or Japanese maple that you want to slow the growth of and thin them out a bit, then now is a pretty good time to do a light prune. Remember…the right tool for the right job…no hacksaws…don’t make me come over there…you know who you are.

Veggie Gardens

Veggie and Flower Gardens

You are still allowed to hand water at this time. With your veggies, you are in harvest mode and with flower gardens you are in deadhead mode. You can add mulch to keep the moisture in the ground. The brighter side is that weeding stays weeded for the most part!! There are some winter crops that you can begin planting right now such as kale, pac choi, carrots and other worthwhile goodies, provided you can keep up with the hand watering.

Summer Hanging Baskets

Hanging Baskets

During the really long hot stretches consider moving them to slightly shadier positions and preferably grouping them. Once a week you might also want to sit them in a tray of water. Clipping back, deadheading and fertilizing will keep them looking healthy. I have actually changed from having the high up hanging baskets to having a lower hanger where I look down on my lovely planters rather than having them hanging on either side of the garage! Continue to feed as required. When a hanging basket stops flowering, it usually means it ran out of food!

water bowls

Wildlife

Keep our feathered and 4 footed friends in mind at this time. I have a couple of water bowls as well as birdbaths out for the birds and one out front for the other evening critters like the raccoons and the skunk down the road that I top up each day and they do get used!! Pools and ponds are drying up and an increasing number of urban wild critters are getting flattened on the roads as they are forced to travel farther distances to get to water sources.

You might want to put out an extra hummingbird feeder or two as well as many of the flower nectar sources are having a very compressed season of bloom.

Hummingbird Feeders

Bears might be coming down out of the mountains earlier than usual and please do help to keep them alive by securing your garbage and compost bins…that might even mean bringing them in to the garage. You can try to cut down on the compost bin smell by sprinkling with a layer of pine shavings every now and again as I have them handy for the 2 chinchillas I inherited the bales are pretty cheap and you can get them from your local feed store. It’s not perfect but it does help a bit. I know some folks use shredded paper but that helps more with the smaller kitchen catchers.

Between this list and your OWN summer to-do list you should have enough on your plate. Remember to take time to smell the roses…literally and take a moment, even if it’s just one where you can be quiet and still and just breathe in the summer because it will not be here for long and you will need to keep a little bit of it in your heart for those long dark November days.

Alright I know… lighten up, but I just went to Costco where they already have puffy jackets, Christmas lights and more ... I was feeling a bit glum and now I am trying not to make eye contact with the Costco-sized jar of Nutella… uh oh.


Thursday, August 20, 2015
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Gardening

After surveying the casualties of my water restricted garden I have decided to rethink my design. The Pacific Temperate Rainforest lately rains mostly in winter and early spring. The last few summers have wreaked havoc on a number of plantings. During my recent walks in the forest I’ve noticed some of our West Coast natives are taking a big hit.

Windmill Palms

I don’t even have to look up to know that I am walking under a Hemlock, the short green needles that should be on the tree carpet the ground below them. In my own garden, many of my plants are taking a hit. I don’t have time to water everything and my priorities for hand watering are the 200 newly grafted apple whips in my backyard. If this is the kind of weather that we will continue to have, I am going to have to be smarter with my garden design! If it is going to be rainforest weather in the winter and California weather in the summer, I will have to be a bit cunning with plant choice and location!

Types of Soil

Know Thy Soil

I wish I had not slept through a great deal of my soils class in college!! My current clay soil creates a soggy layer in the winter and then draws the moisture back in towards it in summer. A sandy soil will be lovely in the winter and then a nightmare in the summer. Different sections of my yard have different soil compositions as I’m sure yours does. The areas around mature trees are very difficult to keep in groundcovers. A thorough soil assessment with a bit of digging and experimenting with drainage (keep a bucket of water with you) now comes closer to the top of the list when it comes to garden design. Know thy soil and work within the limitations or be prepared to dish out a great deal of moolah on replacement plants.

light and Exposure

Light / Exposure

Light requirements should also help steer your garden design. You cannot imagine the number of folks that race into the nursery to buy a beautiful flowering plant for their garden bed and when I ask what the light conditions are, they have absolutely no idea. I wish it were not so, but choosing a plant for a garden design is not like choosing paint colours.

It has never been so important as now to put the right plant in the right place. Map out the area, it doesn’t have to be pretty and then mark where the sun is especially during the hottest hours of the day between 10 and 3. Where once you could have gotten away with shade lovers in a sunnier position just by watering more or putting on the sprinklers a couple of times to mist the area, we are now down to hand watering. Once you have mapped out the area do some research in-store and not just on google

Plants

Take a look at the plants we offer. Choose for the different seasons if you can…google will help but Art's is somewhat more effective at pointing out the plants that work in sun and those that are best in the shade and those that work in your particular climate. Where once I scoffed at Xeriscaping, (we live in a Rainforest don’t we?) I will be now taking another look.

Ornamental Grasses

Grasses are tough and forgiving. Many can take the wet of our winter as long as they aren’t sitting in water and yet still handle drought like conditions. Hardy succulents will play a greater role in my design but I will place them where there is better drainage in the yard. I will create more shade with larger trees and the amount of hand watering will be repaid with decreasing the temperature by a number of degrees in the yard. I will also give my larger trees and shrubs a bit more elbow room in my design. I will create groupings of plants that require more water and groupings for those that require less and this will take some trial and error.

I do love hanging baskets but rather than having them on either side of my garage and by the door in the blazing hot sun I will bring them onto my deck in groupings on low ground hangers. More attractive as I am not waiting for a month looking at the bottom of the pots while they fill in and having them in groupings increases not only their visual impact but makes the watering easier.

Mulch

Mulch Is Not Optional!

Mulch is key. I will religiously mulch my garden each spring with no more than 4 inches of mulch around trees and much less around shrubs and perennials. In times of drought I will add some temporary mulch such as leaves, straw, clean disease free clippings. Even a living mulch such as perennial geraniums around my apple trees do wonders to hold in the moisture. Bare soil loses a tremendous amount of moisture.

Lawns

I will decrease the amount of lawn I have…I liked it originally for the lush green colour, a colour that is absent in my current lawn from July onward. I will take a look at an eco-lawn blend of clover and yarrow and will use different surfacing materials like gravel and mulch and stepping stones in between my plantings.

Attracting Wildlife

Judging from the high number of visitors to my current low tech water bowls and birdbath, I am going to seriously consider a small pond just to help them out…also because it is pretty interesting to watch. A customer that came in to the nursery said they made a fantastic water feature using a rain chain hung on the corner of their pergola and a waterbowl. The number and variety of small birds including hummingbirds that perched, drank and bathed was really quite amazing.

Pergolas and Hardscape

Hardscaping

Which brings me to my final category…hard features such as pergolas, benches and the like. I will be adding a pergola or two to create some shade and structure for vines to climb on. The vines are not as deeply rooted as say trees (with the exception of the Godzillas like Wisteria) and you can create a living shade canopy for your shade lovers without dealing with a large root system.

Our environmental challenges here on the now Not-So-Wet coast does not prevent us from gardening, rather it forces us to become more aware of our surroundings and makes us stronger and smarter gardeners. It will take a bit of trial and error but if we plan, research and plan some more we might just be able to knock one out of the park as far as designs go AND have it survive the summer!!


Thursday, July 9, 2015
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Gardening

The lack of rain is on everyone’s mind this summer and not surprisingly watering is on the top of my to-do list! With watering, timing and duration mean everything. It is better to water in the morning and water deeply and less frequently.

Aged Black Conditioning Mulch

Mulch is a great way to maintain moisture in a garden. Remember when mulching around trees go no deeper than 3 inches, less for shrubs and much less for perennials and grasses. Keep in mind that wood mulch draws nitrogen from the soil as it decomposes so especially with smaller shrubs or perennials remember to fertilize your plants with a little fertilizer containing nitrogen to account for the nitrogen draw.

A temporary mulch I have had great success using on my veggie garden is straw. Especially when I have vacation planned I find the water savings overrule the increase in weeds from dropped seeds. I apply the straw approximately 6 inches deep, lower around new seedlings. So check your local watering regulations, keep calm, keep cool and keep hydrating.

outdoor Shade Sails

One way to keep is cool is to create more shade. we've just started carrying a fantastic line of Shade Sails. Attractive, durable and easy to install. These colourful sails will add shade to any area of your patio, garden or landscape (as long as you have something to mount them to!).

Trees

Trees, yes they will need water as well. Be patient, bring a book or a lawn chair or you can purchase or pick up a Treegator watering bag from Arts Nursery or you can pick up from some municipalities. Depending on how well draining your soil is your trees will need approximately 10 gallons of water per inch of trunk diameter per week and this will take time.

Tree Gator Watering Bag

Towards the end of this month you can do a basic thinning of fruit trees or Japanese maples, or other smaller trees if needed. Make sure you do any pruning outside the branch bark ridge or collar. You can check the International Society of Arboriculture’s website for help. My rule of thumb is to not remove any branches thicker than your thumb at this time and no more than ¼ for the total canopy…sometimes that is just one cut!

Veggie and Flower Gardens

Water, weed and mulch is the order of the day. Plants are coming into bloom and finishing sooner than they would normally, deadhead, pinch back and try to encourage that second flush of blooms so our pollinators have something at the end of the summer!!

Remember when cultivating or scuffling the soil of your garden to watch for our native bees, we have over 500 native bees here and most of them live in solitary nesting holes in sandy south facing soil. If you see some little holes, perhaps leave that area alone, they are not territorial and most don’t sting, but the little guys need all the help they can get these days.

Water Bowls & Bird Baths

Keep your birdbaths and water bowls filled and yes, you can also fill a bowl with small stones and then add water to the edges of the stones to make a watering bowl for the bees and yes…gasp the wasps. Many of those are pollinators too…seriously and don’t roll your eyes at me. If you find yourself with gaps in the flower or veggie garden we have a great mix of replacements including a number of drought tolerant options!

Summer Hanging Basket Care

Hanging Baskets and Planters

When feeding your plants make sure you water first…then feed. If you don’t, it’s just like taking a huge sip of your Mojito without first stirring it. Your first sip is all rum…meh. If your basket has dried out or is very light or you asked your kids to water while they were texting and they didn’t hear you, take them down and place them in a tray of water and clip back the browned bits and let them sit until the pot feels heavy. Some of the potting mixes become hydrophobic once they dry out and need to be soaked to activate them again. You can even use a product like Soil Moist in your basket to store and release water as it is needed.

Floaters For Your Pond

Ponds

Don’t forget to top up the water as you will be losing a lot of it through evaporation. To help combat that, as well as algae, remember to pick up some floating oxygenators. If 75-80% of the surface is covered with lilies or oxygenators you will have clearer, cooler water.

LawnLift Grass Paint

Lawns

Your lawns are supposed to look golden brown at this time of year! Your local watering restrictions likely have you down to 1 watering per week, which in most cases will be enough to keep your lawn alive until Fall. Water in the morning and use the tuna can method to measure the 1 inch of water your lawn needs. Make sure your sprinklers are efficient and delivering water to the right place. Don't waste! If you decide to conserve water, but still like the green look, we have LawnLift, a non-toxic lawn paint!! It actually works quite well.

Shrubs

We have had a lot of folks through with infestations of aphids on the new growth of their tender shrubs. When you see them you can simply hose them off with a good stream of water from the hose. If they are a repeat problem you might like to use ladybugs…aphids are their favorite thing to eat…like me and chocolate cake !! We have bags of ladybugs ready to go.

Buy Lady Bugs

Be sure to release them in the evening and give them a bit of a misting of 1:1 solution of sugary pop and water. It temporarily grounds them and prevents them from migrating…which is the first thing they like to do when they get out of the bag. By the time their wings unstick…they have found a great source of food which you have so graciously provided and stick around!

That should do for now, pop by and say hi and go for a look see in one of our golf carts. We have a lovely mix of plants, including lots of new ones, and awesome garden designers! You might just get an idea or two!

Cheers

Laurelle


Thursday, July 9, 2015
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Gardening

Weeks without rain, smaller than average winter snow packs, higher than normal summer temperatures and more people than ever before have put an undue strain on Metro Vancouver’s water supply.

We all have to do what we can to preserve our water resources. Lawn watering is one of the biggest consumers of fresh water and that’s why summer watering restrictions have become the norm. At time of writing, Metro Vancouver is at Stage 2, meaning you can only water your lawn once per week, and only in the morning. You are still allowed to hand water your flower beds, vegetable gardens and containers as necessary. With that said, it is important to plan our gardens to minimize our water use. The easiest way to do this is by making sure we simply put the right plant in the right place. You can also water effectively. Check out this Youtube Video on Summer Watering Techniques

While many plants are drought tolerant once established, they still need ample moisture until their roots grow and become established. The plants mentioned in this post need less water than others. So without further ado, here is a collection of great drought tolerant plants for your garden.

Drought Tolerant Perennials

Sedums

Sedum

An often underused perennial group, Sedums are a succulent that stores water in its leaves. They available in upright and spreading varieties in a number of different colours. Flowers appear in late summer in shades of white, yellow, pink or near red depending on the variety. Tough and dependable. Prefers full sun and well drained soil. Growth can be up to 1-2ft in height and spread.

Lavender | Lavandula

Lavender

Lavandula

Lavender is one of the most popular perennials for the summer garden. Thin green-gray stems give way to violet-lavender coloured blooms. Both foliage and flowers are fragrant. Great drought tolerance make it ideal for hot and dry areas. It can also be used as a cut flower. Full sun and well drained soils are recommended. Use as a specimen, an informal low edge, in rock gardens or in containers.

Echincea | Coneflower

Coneflower

Echinacea

Echinaceas or Coneflowers are popular summer blooming perennials that grow in attractive clumps. Growers have spent countless hours hybridizing Echinaceas to create dozens of new varieties. The classic Echinacea is light pink to purple in colour. Newer varieties are available in a multitude of colours including yellow, orange, red, white and even green. These drought tolerant perennials prefer full sun and well drained soils.

Kniphofia | Red Hot Poker Plant

Red Hot Poker

Kniphofia

Red Hot Poker plants have grass-like green foliage and tall flower spikes in shades of yellow, orange and red. Flowers are often described as ‘torch-like’. Prefers sun and well drained soil.

Euphorbia

Euphorbia

A large group of semi-evergreen perennials originally from the Mediterranean. Euphorbias feature vertical or arching stems that are borne from a single crown. Stems tend to be bare at the base and leafy near the top. Flower heads are attractively unique and eye-catching. May need the occasional hard prune to keep it looking nice. Available in many varieties and colours. Gives a great hot climate look to the garden. Prefers full sun and well drained soils. Size and spread differ by variety.

Perovskia | Russian Sage

Russian Sage

Perovskia atriplicifolia

Long upright light coloured stems and flowers in shades of purplish blue give Russian Sage a boost in the drought tolerant garden. This attractive, yet tough plant tolerates cold, poor soil and drought! Needs full sun and a well drained soil.

Artemisia

Tough, hardy and reliable Artemisia is a great perennial for the drought tolerant garden. White to silvery gray foliage gives a clue to its drought tolerance. Foliage can be either finely delicate to coarse. A trouble free, low maintenance plant for the full sun and well drained soil.

Catmint

Nepeta x faassenii

A perfect perennial for rock gardens, containers and borders. Aromatic foliage and flowers attract butterflies and bees. Catmint blooms from early summer to early fall. Grows 1-3ft high and wide, depending on the variety.

Rosemary | Rosmarinus

Rosemary

Rosmarinus officinalis

This popular edible is often used as a kitchen herb more than an ornamental plant. Pine needle-like foliage is highly aromatic and can grow up to 5ft tall depending on variety. Needs full sun and well drained soil. Can be grown in the garden or in a pot. Harvest as needed for the kitchen! May need some winter protection if the temperatures get low or too wet.

Sempervivum | Hens and Chicks

Hens n Chicks

Sempervivum

Low growing, rosette forming evergreen perennials ideal for use as groundcovers, in rock gardens on vertical walls. Single hens give birth to chicks allowing the plant to grow into clumps 1-2ft wide over time. Plant in groups for great effect. Likes full sun and well drained soils.

Drought Tolerant Ornamental Grasses

While many ornamental grasses are low maintenance and waterwise, these four are some of our favourites.

Mexican Feather Grass | Stipa | Nassella

Mexican Feather Grass

Stipa tenuissima

Wispy thin green blades give way to golden tan, almost blonde summer flower heads. This lovely warm season grass forms clumps 1-2ft tall and wide. Very drought tolerant and beautiful when planted in groups.

Helictotrichon | Blue Oat Grass

Blue Oat Grass

Helictotrichon sempervirens

Blue Oat Grass is an upright growing, clump forming grass with stiff blue-gray blades. Blonde flower clusters form above the foliage. Clumps can grow 2-3ft tall and wide. Very commonly used in boulevards and low maintenance landscapes. Prefers full sun and well drained soils.

Festuca | Fescue

Fescue

Festuca

Fescues are a large group of low growing, clumping forming, drought tolerant grasses with silvery, blue-gray foliage. Great when planted in groups in rock gardens or when used as an accent plant. As a warm season grass, it can be cut back in spring. Tolerates sun or part sun.

Pampas Grass | Cortaderia

Pampas Grass

Cortaderia selloana

An ever popular clump forming plant, Pampas Grass is a native of South America and features stiff, sharp blades with clumps of feathery white to pink flowers held on top of tall spikes. Grows quickly and can reach 8ft tall depending on variety. Prefers sun to part shade and well drained soil.

Other Drought Tolerant Plants

California Lilac | Ceanothus

California Lilac

Ceanothus thyrsiflorus

This attractive and popular evergreen features glossy, dark green foliage and blue bottle-brush like flowers in late spring through early summer. Loves the sun and well drained soil. Needs very little water once established. Grows to form a mid-sized shrub 6-12ft tall and wide. Looks good all year round and does well in seaside locations too. May need from winter protection if it gets cold. A sheltered location away from wind and wet weather is ideal.

Juniper | Juniperus

Junipers

Juniperus

While we can’t honestly say they are our favourite conifers, Junipers are particularly well suited to dry environments. They are available in many types, ranging from large upright growing trees to ground-hugging, spreading varieties. Colour is typically green to blue-gray depending on the variety

Yucca

Yuccas

These desert plants have spiky, pointed leaves and do well with very little water. They grow a long taproot and can usually find the water they need on their own. Large white flower spikes add interest when they bloom in early summer. Several varieties are commonly available including ones with variegated foliage. Full sun and well-drained soil are necessary. While they can tolerate our winter temperatures, it is often too wet for them – make sure they do not sit in wet soil during the cooler months.

Agave

Agave

Another plant from the desert, Agaves are succulents with beautiful, structural shapes that make them ideal for modern gardens. Wicked spikes and thorns force people and pets to keep their distance from these plants. Needs exceptionally well drained soils in our climate. It’s probably best planted in containers that can be protected during the winter. Many varieties and sizes of Agave are available.

Bougainvillea Vine

Bougainvillea

This vibrant, twining vine has beautifully coloured, papery flowers in summer. Flower colour ranges peachy-yellow through red , all the way to purple. Nasty thorns on the vine make it an ideal barrier plant. Needs full sun and dry, well drained soil. Does exceptionally well in desert locations. We find that it thrives on neglect and may survive our mild winters when given shelter and good drainage.

While there are many other drought tolerant plants available at Art’s Nursery, these selections give you a sense of the variety and options that are available for your garden. If you have any questions about being water-wise, give us a call or drop by and visit us in person. As always, call ahead to confirm availability as our selection is always changing.


Friday, August 15, 2014
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Succulents

Succulents are some of the most versatile and easy plants to care for in the garden. They require little water and average to sandy soil. If given the right amount of light they pretty much take care of themselves!

They can be planted up to fill an old leaky birdbath to create a riot of texture and colour. They can be used vertically in a frame to create living art. They can grace the gravelly, dry soil at the end of your driveway and they can more than hold their own in a perennial bed!

Sensational Succulents in Bird Bath

The flowers of many sedums are well loved by pollinators and you will often find butterflies and native bee species hovering around the flowers. Succulents are some of my favorite go-to plants for garden design. Here is my list of fun and easy go to succulents… or as I like to call them, the illustrious eleven!

Chinese Dunce Cap

Chinese Dunce Cap

Orostachys iwarenge

This entertaining little succulent grows to about 5-6 inches in height and about 10 inches wide. The little rosettes begin to flower and form little caps. It is a lovely blue-ish grey with some pink overtones. Each rosette that flowers dies back but other non-flowering rosettes will become next year’s crop. Can be hardy to zone 6 with very well- draining and almost dry conditions but I think it might get too wet here in the winter as I haven’t had much luck overwintering it. It’s a lot of fun especially in planters or planted in broken halves of pottery and mixed with other succulents. Even if it is too wet here to overwinter it (I’ll try it this time under an overhang), will definitely add it again next spring!

Cebenese Cobweb Houseleek

Cebenese Cobweb Houseleek

Sempervivum arachnoidium ‘Cebenese’

THIS is a hardy must have…especially for any upcoming Halloween planters!! This Hen and Chick plant looks like it is covered in cobwebs. It is AWESOME paired with Dragon’s Blood Sedum! It has been gracing the nooks and crannies by my steps for a few years now. When you get the odd baby hen and chick, I just stick the little rosette onto the ground and away it grows. Hardy to zone 4, Sempervivum arachniodium loves a dry, average, neutral to slightly alkaline soil in a sunny spot for best colour. It grows 3-6 inches in height and about 12 inches wide. Evergreen.

Dragons Blood Sedum

Dragon’s Blood Sedum

Sedum spurium ‘Dragon’s Blood’

This is a tough-as-nails sedum that forms a low dense mat in poor and dry soil. The bright red flowers and the greenish with purple red edging of the leaves add a fantastic colour contrast against the other lighter coloured succulents. This plant is hardy to zone 4, for infertile, dry sites in the sun.Evergreen.

Babys Tears Sedum

Baby’s Tears Sedum

Sedum album chloroticum 'Babys Tears'

Not only does this plant have an awesome name but it is amazingly cool. It has attractive little round leaves in a fresh glossy green that will form a dense carpet and drape down over the sides of the pot. There are more than enough of these little ball-like leaves which are as addictively fun to squish as bubble wrap! It is hardy to zone 4 and has delicate little white flowers in late spring to summer. I love using this little sedum in a container mixed with other plants and grasses at the containers edge to highlight the cascading effect or in rockeries or stepped gardens. It grows in full sun and grows to about 3-4 inches in height and about 12 inches wide. Evergreen.

Lime Zinger Sedum

Sedum ‘Lime Zinger’

This is an attractive floriferous new sedum with a compact habit and great fresh lime coloured green leaves edged in burgundy. It forms almost a mat of pinky white flowers later summer. It grows to about 6 inches high and forms clumps approximately 18 inches wide. Grow in full sun, in average, well draining soil. Hardy to zone 4.

Black Hen n Chick

Sempervivum 'black'

Another favourite hen and chick selection with a rich burgundy red edging, to complete burgundy in the sun. So don’t ask me why it is called 'black' hens and chicks. Maybe they named it at night. If you want to make a sempervivum quilt groundcover in your garden it is a lot of fun to mix it with the cobweb hens and chicks. Hardy to zone 4. Plant in full sun in average well drained to dry soil. Evergreen.

Angelina Sedum

Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’

Another fantastically coloured succulent to mix in a succulent planter is Sedum 'Angelina'. Also awesome if you have a face container…it kind of looks like golden medusa hair. In early summer it is a bright lime chartreuse and then with more sun it becomes a golden yellow and then golden yellow with red edging at the end of summer and into fall. If you thought that was enough, you thought wrong…it also has clusters of starry yellow flowers in summer too! This clumping groundcover sedum grows to about 4-6 inches in height and will spread to about 18 inches. It is hardy to zone 5 and will grow in full to part sun in well-draining average soil. Evergreen.

Autumn Joy Sedum

Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’

This lovely, taller growing sedum graces my perennial garden. I actually do a little pinching back of this succulent in late spring when it is about 6 inches tall, that way I get a more compact floriferous plant. If you want taller you can skip this step. Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ is a reliable and beautiful later summer and fall bloomer. The blooms are held above the plant like broccoli and are a dusky pink. They work well with the gentle grey green of the leaves and are absolutely spectacular when paired with Rudbeckia and Perovskia for a fall display. Plant in full sun in an average well drained soil. It will grow to about 2 feet tall and wide and is hardy to zone 3.

Red Cauli Sedum

Sedum ‘Red Cauli’

This lovely sedum variety forms mounds of silvery olive-grey leaves which give rise to pink-red clusters of flowers in late summer. Flowers are held above the foliage on slender burgundy stems. A breathtaking flower display! It grows to about 12 inches high and about 2 feet wide. It is hardy to zone 4. Plant in sun in well drained soil.

Sedum Cape Blanco

Sedum spathulifolium ‘Cape Blanco’

This sedum makes a pretty awesome startlingly powdery grey-green mat of tiny leaves which create amazing contrast against the starry sunshine-yellow flowers in later summer. This evergreen succulent needs a very well draining site in the winter. It grows to about 2-3 inches high and forms a mat about 18 inches wide. It is hardy to zone 6. Evergreen.

Blue Spruce Sedum

Sedum reflexum ‘Blue Spruce’

Another great Medusa-haired specimen. This sedum forms little succulent ‘branches’ that look like small evergreens. It forms a mat of blue-green leaves with yellow flowers held above the leaves in later summer. The blue leaves become tinged with red in cooler weather. A great groundcover sedum or lovely hanging over the side of a planter! Hardy to zone 4. Plant in sun in a very well drained average soil. Evergreen.

These are just a few of the many great sedums and succulent available at Art's Nursery. Drop by today and check them out. Our selection is always changing so call ahead, 604.882.1201, if you are looking for a specific variety.


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Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

We pride ourselves on providing high quality plant, expert advice and an exceptional gardening experience.

Noteworthy Blogs

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Recent Posts

Thursday, November 9, 2017
Top 6 Colourful Winter Plants

Winter is here and so are some spectacular colorful plants! Although it can be harder to find things...

Tuesday, November 7, 2017
Amazing Amaryllis

What do Poinsettias, Prepared Hyacinths, Paperwhite Daffodils and Amaryllis have in common? They are...

Friday, October 6, 2017
Gardening With Ornamental Grasses

If you’re looking for low maintenance plants that provide lovely texture and movement in your garden...

Friday, October 6, 2017
8 New Colourful Companion Bulbs for Fall 2017

Bulb growers are doing their best to make flower combinations as easy as possible. In fact, they hav...

Thursday, September 21, 2017
Favourite Plants for Fall Planters

While anytime is a good time to plant, Fall is particularly rewarding because of the immediate resul...

Friday, June 16, 2017
Plant Something BC Contest

It's your last chance to enter the Plant Something BC contest. Here's how to enter:

Friday, June 16, 2017
Plants for a Tropical Paradise

With summer just around the corner, now is a great time to add a touch of the tropics to your garden...

Wednesday, March 29, 2017
Strawberry Growing Basics

If you ask people what their favourite summertime berry is… odds are they will say Strawberry. These...

Wednesday, March 29, 2017
New Flower Bulbs For 2017

Is it possible that Christmas comes again in March? Every year, new summer blooming bulb varieties a...


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