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Tuesday, August 6, 2019
Posted By: Desiree Markewich in Bulbs


With the final days of summer slowly approaching it’s only natural for us gardeners to start planning for next year. The first thing to spring to mind (no pun intended) is fall planting bulbs: Crocus, Tulips, Hyacinth and many more. Often the first sign of colour we are rewarded with in the garden during early spring, planting bulbs in the fall is easy, affordable, and something you must try - if you havent already!

Early Fall (September) is when these flowering beauties start to arrive at the nursery, but we encourage you to Pre-Order early, so you don’t miss out on the 20 stunning new varieties we are recieving this year. 

Early Spring Flowering Bulbs


 
If you want to feel the warm glow of sunshine in early spring, try new varieties Crocus ‘Early Gold’ or Iris ‘Katherine’s Gold’. These yellow cuties are very petite in nature, only growing 4-6 inches tall! This small size makes them perfect for containers or small gardens.
 

Desire something with a bit more colour and size? Try out Narssisus Colourful Companions 'Dancin' in the Sun' combo. An early spring charmer growing to a height of 16 inches and featuring 2 different varieties of white, gold and yellow daffodils.

Mid Spring Flowering Bulbs


For some interest in the garden during mid spring, you can’t go wrong with either Daffodil 'Acropolis' or 'Falmouth Bay'. An elegant almost pure white colour and nice height of 16-20 inches makes this pair stand out among fellow plants gracing the period between spring and summer.

 

The perfect Daffodil (Narcissus) for a patio or smaller garden has to be Narcissus ‘White Petticoat’. Growing to a dimure height of 4 inches, this adorable white daffodil has deep green stems making the crisp white of the blooms even more notable.
 

A featured bulb this year, Tulipa ‘Canadian Liberator’ was released to honour and celebrate 75 years of European Liberation! Canadian Liberator stands tall at 22 inches high and is a strong, bright red, featuring nearly perfect shaped flowers.
 

If you love pink and are looking for some mid spring color we suggest Tulipa ‘Foxtrot’ or Colourful Companions ‘Rasberry Meringue’. Foxtrot is a fragrant, double tulip in a glorious bubblegum pink and Rasberry Meringue combines a creamy white, double daffodil with a matching creamy tulip with raspberry pink accents.

Late Spring


To bring a few splashes of pink to your late spring garden as well, or if enjoy foraging in the garden for cut flower arrangements then you must choose Double Tulip ‘Dazzling Sensation’ or ‘Crispion Sweet’. Crispion Sweet has full, solid pink flowers with fringed petals, while Dazzling Sensation’s blooms are packed with smoother petals with white feathering at the outer petal edges. 
   


Two later Spring flowers that will become a focal point in the garden, and that pollinators can’t miss are Allium ‘Rosy Dream’ and Colourful Companions ‘Hot Shots’. Rosy Dream will grow to 18 inches and feature lovely, globe-like purple blooms, and Hot Shots combines two vivid red tulip varieties that stand at a grand 24 inches tall.


Summer




To get the most out of planting bulbs in the fall you can extend your flowering season into summer by choosing plants such as the Camas or Foxtail Lily. Foxtail Lilies (Eremurus) are extrodinarily tall, perennials that have massive flower spikes. For pink flowers try Eremurus ‘Shelford Pink' or ‘Robustus’ and for orange blooms ‘Cleopatra’. Camassia leichtini ‘Alba’ is an equally tall plant, bearing flower spikes matching the Foxtail Lilies grandeur but in a pale white shade with larger individual flowers upon the spike.   

Garlic

 



If flowers aren’t your thing, or your just enjoy growing your own veggies we suggest planting garlic this fall. Planting garlic is easy, all you have to do is separate each garlic bulb carefully into individual cloves. Plant your cloves in a rich soil by pushing each clove 1-2 inches into the soil with the flat side down and pointed-tip upwards towards the surface of the soil. Your harvest will be ready anytime from Spring through Summer. You will know when the leaves have become mostly yellow, i.e. more yellow on the leaf than there is green. Chesnok, Yugoslavian and Mixed Gourmet varieties are new this year! 

Pre-Order

Any of the bulbs featured in this article. Simply click on the bulb mentioned in the article and it will take you to our pre-order page! 

Pre-Orders end September 1, 2019 when bulbs start to arrive. For availability after September 1 call in store (604) 882 1201.


Friday, August 21, 2015
Posted By: in Gardening

As we enter the 'dog-days' of summer our gardens are smothered by heat, shorted on water and deprived of nutrients. What looked fantastic in May looks a wee-bit tired by late summer. One of the lessons of garden design is to visit your garden centres throughout the year. That way you can see what looks good in the different seasons. Use these seven plants to brighten up and re-invigorate the garden, containers and landscapes in August.

Sedum Sun Sparkler Firecracker

Sun Sparkler Firecracker Sedum

Sedum 'Firecracker'

Sun Sparkler Firecracker is a brilliant burgundy-red Sedum with clusters of soft pink flowers in late summer. Its perfect for shallow containers or tucked into rockery or a green wall, where it will gently cascade. An excellent groundcover or accent for borders and rock gardens. Great low water, low maintenance plant. Grows 6-8 inches tall and wide. Hardy in USDA zones 4-10. Prefers full sun

Anemone Fantasy Cinderella

Anemone Fantasy Cinderella

Anemone x hybrida 'Cinderella'

This heavy blooming, single, rose-pink anemone has a very compact growth habit. Good for beds, borders and patio pots. It is very versatile and easy to grow. Tolerates a range of soil types and prefers full sun to part shade. Blooms in late summer through fall. Grows 12-18 inches tall and up to 24 inches wide.

Fireworks Pennisetum

Fireworks Pennisetum

Pennisetum setaceum 'Fireworks'

This gorgeous annual pennisetum is a show stopper in the garden. It's a colour, upright growing grass with variegated stripes of white, green, burgundy and hot pink running the length of the blade. Purple tassles appear in summer. Unlike the species, this cultivar does not reseed. Plant as a specimen or in mass for a stunning display of color. A great addition to containers and beds near your patio or deck. Grow in full sun in rich, moist, fertile soil. Likes regular watering. Excellent in containers, borders and flower beds. Grows 36-48 inches tall and 24-36 inches wide.

Now Cheesier Coneflower

Now Cheesier Coneflower

Echinacea 'Now Cheesier'

This bright and showy selection is a vigorous, new and improved version of 'Mac and Cheese' Coneflower. Large flowers open a deep orange-gold and age to a lighter gold in summer through fall. Perfect for perennial borders, mixed borders and wildlife gardens. Grows 24-26 inches tall and 18-24 inches wide. Prefers full to part sun and moderate watering. Hardy in zones 4-9.

Sombrero Salsa Red Coneflower

Sombrero Salsa Red Coneflower

Echinacea x 'Balsomsed'

Sombrero Salsa Red is a striking echinacea with big, bright red blooms excellent for an easy, colourful summer border. A must-have for the butterfly or cutting garden. Its a drought tolerant perennial that was bred for cold hardiness and compact form with prolific flowering over an exceptionally long season. Flowers from late spring through summer and reaches a height of 24-26 inches tall and 16 to 22 inches wide. Prefers full sun. Hardy in zones 4-9

Red Heart Hibiscus

Red Heart Rose of Sharon

Hibiscus syriacus 'Red Heart'

Red Heart Hibiscus is a deciduous shrub with single white blooms with a red centre in late summer on a medium sized shrub. Grows 4-6ft tall and 6-8 ft high. Prefers full sun to part shade. In general, hibiscus are heavy feeders, if you notice yellowing leaves, feed it with a balanced fertilizer and ensure that it is not being over-watered. Hardy in zones 5-9

rhapsody in pink crape myrtle

Rhapsody in Pink Crape Myrtle

Lagerstroemia indica 'Whit VIII'

Rhapsody in Pink is a wonderful large deciduous shrub or small tree very common in warmer drier climates. It features brilliant pink flowers in summer through fall which is accented by attractive purplish, deer resistant foliage. Prefers full sun and moist, but well drained soils. Fertilize in spring. In our temperate climate, the shrub is usually hardy but often does not get enough summer warmth to deliver the beautiful flowers in abundance. Hardy in zones 7-9.

heuchera_berrysmoothie

Berry Smoothie Coral Bells

Heuchera 'Berry Smoothie'

Perennial Heucheras are fantastic source of colour when summer blooms have faded. Berry Smoothie features large, gently-lobed, metallic rose-pink leaves in spring that darken to bronze-red by summer. It is tolerate of summer heat too. It adds brilliant colour and contrast to mixed containers and woodland plants. It is well suited to containers. Tall flower spikes are apparent but not always showy. Best grown in part sun with moderate watering. Grows 18-25 inches tall and 12-18 inches wide. Hardy in zones 4-8.

As always, call Arts Nursery ahead of time to confirm availability as our selection is constantly changing. If you have any questions about these or other plants, drop by in person or call 604.882.1201.

 


Thursday, November 13, 2014
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Bulbs

Amaryllis, or Hippeastrum are flowering bulbs from the subtropics of Central and Southern America. In their native climates, they are spring flowering perennials, but in our northern latitudes, they are an extremely popular winter flowering indoor plant. Once planted, they will often burst into bloom in 5-7 weeks. Therefore, if you plant them now in early November, you can get them to show their colours just in time for Christmas!

Amaryllis Flower Collage

Amaryllis foliage is green and strap-like. Once the bulb is planted, flower stalks begin to grow and bloom to produce large flowers in shades of white, pink, red, green and various combinations thereof. There are also varieties with striped and multi-colours. Larger bulbs produce more flowers so choose your bulbs carefully! There is a reason the big-box stores sell cheap Amaryllis, they are small bulbs.

How To Grow AmaryllisAmaryllis Bulb

To grow Amaryllis, place the bottom part of the bulb and the roots into luke-warm water for a few hours to help it rehydrate. Plant the bulb in an indoor pot 4-6 weeks prior to the desired bloom time. Press the soil down firmly around the bulb, but avoid damaging the roots. When planting, keep at least 1/3 of the bulb above the soil level. If you can see the neck of the bulb above the soil, you know you are in good shape! Once planted, leave them alone as they mildly resent root disturbance. The best location for an Amaryllis is bright and warm, and completely frost free. Water sparingly until the stem appears. When actively growing, they are heavy feeders and drinkers so increase the amount of water and fertilizer as needed. Although it is a bulb, a light application of a flowering plant fertilizer will improve flower production. Choose any fertilizer with a high middle number.

Amaryllis Care

After flowering, cut off the spent blooms and when the stem begins to sag, cut off the foliage to the top of the bulb. Continue to water and feed in order to allow the leaves to fully develop. This allows the plant to store more nutrients in the bulb during the warm season. When the leaves begin to yellow, the plant is entering its dormant state. At this point, cut off the leaves and remove the bulb from the soil. Clean the bulb and store in a cool, frost-free dry location. Do not water or feed during this stage. Store the bulb for 6-8 weeks. At this point, you can replant and enjoy your Amaryllis next year!

2014 Amaryllis Varieties

This year we are featuring nearly a dozen different varieties of Amaryllis in-store and online. A few have already sold out, but here are 9 of the ones still available (as of November 13, 2014)

Amaryllis Varieties 2014

Drop by Arts Nursery in person to get yours, or shop for Amaryllis online and we'll have it delivered to you! Quantities of Amaryllis, especially the newer varieties are usually limited so order yours early! They are usually in-stock from late October through December.


Monday, September 16, 2013
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Bulbs

In 1593 Tulips were brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. They quickly became sought after and the price increased steadily.Early tulips were mostly solid coloured. After some time, a mosaic virus began affecting the flowers appearance creating variegation and streaks of colour. These attractive new varieties added fuel to the market fire.

Tulips in Landscape

Between 1634 and 1637 enthusiasm over tulips reached an all-time high. In fact, it triggered a speculative frenzy known as tulip mania. Single bulbs could change hands up to 10 times per day in speculative trading. The demand for tulips was so extreme that the price for a single bulb could reach many times the annual income of a skilled craftsman.

In fact, at one point in history, tulips were treated as a form of currency. Kind of makes me wonder how a merchant would give change after a purchase? Perhaps a few snowdrops and a couple of crocus bulbs?

As with all business cycles, Tulip Mania ended badly for investors. However, the venerable tulip has managed to survive and even thrive. New varieties are released into the market each and every year in order to excite and delight gardeners. The seemingly endless parade of colours, styles and varieties are sure to inspire even the toughest non-gardener to give in and plant a couple of packs.

New Tulips for 2013

This fall, 2013, 12 new varieties of tulips caught our eye. These were:

  • Fire Wings Lily Flowering Tulip – 20in
  • Parrot Prince Tulip – 20in
  • Night Rider Viridiflora Tulip – 20in
  • Cartouche Double Peony Tulip – 18in
  • Super Parrot Tulip – 16in
  • La Belle Epoque Double Peony Tulip – 12in
  • Irene Parrot Tulip – 12in
  • Flaming Flag – 20in
  • Joint Division – Fringed Tulip – 20in
  • Ruby Prince Single Early Tulip– 14in
  • Purple Dream Tulip – 20in

Tulips In The Landscape

Tulips generally sprout in mid to late spring, after the daffodils. Like other bulbs, tulips are best massed in the landscape or container. In my humble opinion, the worst thing you can do buy just one pack. Buy three or five, or more of each variety. The resulting display of colour and style will be well worth it.

Loose Tulip Bulbs

Planting Tulips

Plant tulips in the fall, before hard frosts signal the beginning of winter. Dig a hole approximately two plus times their depth. Place the tulip in the hole and add bonemeal or bulb food . Make sure the pointy-side of the bulb is facing up otherwise the bulb will get confused and may take a long time to reach the surface. Cover the bulb up with soil. Pat down the soil and water them in to remove air pockets and ensure good soil-bulb contact. Space planting holes 4-6 inches apart. It is always a good idea to place a marker in your garden identifying the planted area. Tulips grow best in sunny, or lightly shaded areas that are not excessively wet or soggy.

Tulips are perennials, meaning they will come back year after year. Unfortunately, tulips generally degrade over time. While it is not always the case, we find that tulips look great in the first year, average in the second and mediocre by the third. We recommend getting into a planting cycle wherein you are adding new tulip bulbs to your garden each year.

Tulip Availability

Tulip bulbs are generally available from September until mid-November. The best selection is in early September.

If you have any questions about tulips, drop by Art's Nursery or give us a call at 604.882.1201


Friday, June 14, 2013
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Shrubs

Deciduous flowering shrubs are the workhorses of the garden.  They are the infill of the garden, the middle part or depth of a good design and very, very necessary.   Flowering evergreen shrubs are lovely, but in my opinion there are few that will stop you in your tracks to watch them at their height of glory like one that has one season less to make magic in.

Many of these are old fashioned, and many have only one season of interest, but oh... what a season.  Here are my top 4 must have deciduous flowering shrubs for the garden:

Philadelphus

Philadelphus

Mock orange, not to be confused with Choysia or Mexican Mock Orange which is also a pretty nice plant.  I have the golden leaved Philadelphus  at the front of my house.  You’ll want to plant this one by a window that opens, the fragrance of the soft white single or double flowers which generally open in June is my favorite of all time.  It is a medium vaselike shrub growing to about 8 feet high by about 6  feet wide with soft grass green or gold leaves depending on the variety.

It prefers a part shade area (protection from the hot afternoon sun is a must have for the single flowering golden leaved varieties), with humic, well draining soil.  They are often not pretty when you get them, not sure if its because they are constricted to a small pot or perhaps too exposed to the wind but once you dig them into the garden and they can stretch and breath (very scientific eh?), you will be amazed at how sturdy, versatile, beautiful and oh my how fragrant.

In fact, if it wasn’t raining right now I’d be typing this on my front steps near my Philadelphus.  There are a few varieties out there that aren’t scented and though lovely it’s like being handed a cupcake with no icing.  Sad.  Depending on variety, Philadelphus can be hardy to zone 4.

Spirea

Spirea

Another mighty workhorse to the garden is the Spirea.  There are many forms and a stunning array of leaf colours and sizes from the sprawling fountain like grandeur of the Spriea ‘Tor' in full bloom -  to the compact 1-2 punch of the Spirea ‘Lime Mound’ with its chartreuse leaves and pink flowers at the end of June and beginning of July.

I am tickled pink with the leaf colour on these never mind that they flower, and are actually softly fragrant.  ‘Little Princess’ literally gets covered in pink blooms which are usually sporting a number of content looking butterflies.  I am starting to wonder if they come with the plant.

This group of shrubs are easy to care for and like an average, well drained soil in sun to part shade.  If you get the lighter leaved varieties consider placing them out of a high wind area or some protection from afternoon sun to avoid burned leaf edges.

I have limited room but have a Spirea ‘Goldflame’ which I coppice right to the ground in later winter so that it remains a tidy little pom pom of a plant.   The size of spirea ranges from about 3-4 feet by about 3-4 feet.  'Bridal Veil' and some of the others are a bit larger (10 feet high by 20 feet wide) so make sure you choose the right spirea for you.  Most are hardy to zone 3.

Weigela

Weigela

This is a plant that I have always had in my garden in one form or another.  When I was little I made a fort out of this sprawling vase shaped shrub and listened to the bees when it was in full bloom.  Honey bees, bumble bees, humming birds and butterflies love this plant.  So do I.

The trumpet shaped flowers are glorious and happen over the course of 2 to 3 weeks in June-July but oh what a show.  If you are lucky, they will take a bit of a break and bloom a bit in late summer.   There are now burgundy leaved varieties and green leaved striped with chartreuse and some edged in gold and one with a lovely completely green gold leaf  to extend the season of interest.  There are some lower growing but they can attain a height of about 12-15 feet by about 5-6 feet.  These shrubs appreciate a light pruning after blooming so that next years blooms have time to form on the new wood.

Rubidor and ‘Wine and Roses’ are two that come to mind with excellent leaf colour as well.  Do use the golds and burgundy leaved plants sparingly in your garden to give a punch of colour.  Filling your garden full of golds and burgundy and variegated shrubs will just create visual unrest.

Physocarpus - Ninebark

Physocarpus

Ninebark, as it is also known, is an upright shrub to create visual interest and texture at the back of the border both in summer and with the shredding bark in the winter.  There are green leaved, gold leaved and multihued burgundy and chocolate leaved varieties.

The blossoms are held in corymbs and are usually white to slightly pinkish white.  Some are red in bud and white in bloom followed by brown or red seed heads to extend interest as in ‘Center Glow’.  The average growth rate is about 6-8 feet by about 5-6 feet and there are a number of dwarf varieties if you have limited space.  They favour sun but will take part shade and average, well draining soils will suffice.

Prune by thinning out some (no more than 1/3)  of the branches to the ground creating an open  habit.  Most are hardy to zone 3.Physocarpus is a great shrub to provide colour and interest to the garden. It is available in both shrub and tree form.

Hibiscus syriacus - Rose of Sharon

Hibiscus syriacus – Rose of Sharon

This hardy form of hibiscus is always an eyecatcher.   Its blooms are exotic looking.  They are smaller single and double versions of the tropical hibiscus blossoms.  The bark is silvery grey and the leaves are grass green.  Be patient in the spring.  This late summer glory will be one of the last of your deciduous shrubs to leaf out.  In spite of its exotic look, this shrub is a tough cookie.  Plant in sun in average soil.  Most will grow to about 6-8 feet and will be about 5-6 feet high.   They are hardy to zone 5.

These are a few of the deciduous flowering shrubs that are worthwhile members of a strong garden design.  They are hardy, they are tough and they are a few of the workhorses of your garden.

Arts Nursery stocks a wide variety of deciduous shrubs year round. As always, call to confirm the availability of specific varieties as our selection changes frequently. If you have any questions, visit us in person or call 604.882.1201.


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Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

We pride ourselves on providing high quality plant, expert advice and an exceptional gardening experience.


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8940 192nd Street,
Surrey, BC, Canada,
V4N 3W8

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