Today's Hours: Thursday 9:00am - 8:00pm Tel: 604.882.1201
  LoginCreate Account 
Directions  | Contact Us
Display Blog Posts With Specified Tag
Wednesday, February 11, 2015
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Gardening

Welcome back to the start of another garden season. We’ve had a little break, we’ve painted, power washed and built a few more bits and pieces around here and if you are like me you’re chomping at the bit…nah, I’m lying…I have a few more books I want to read. So if you are not like me and are impatient to get cracking on your garden I have an awesome list for you. One part planning, one part actual work and one part shopping. It’s an awesome to-do garden sandwich if you ask me!

The Planning Part

If you have a spot for a garden corkboard that you can pin up lists, drawings, it will make your planning process easier. I know a corkboard is old school but there is something about walking by it every day that reminds me and helps me to focus on what I need to get done.

If you haven’t done so already take stock of your garden. Take photos and note any bare areas that you would like to do over. Pay special attention to any drainage issues and as soon as it’s dry, you can start to address them.

Make a wish list both for plants and for hardware…like 2 new digging shovels for me and hard features…like a bench or a birdbath.

Make a list of plants to divide up, prune, or bring in for forcing.

Gardening Magazines

Now is a great time to peruse the garden magazines and catalogues.

Make a note of any shrubs or perennials you would like to move and flag them…I have to do this part because otherwise I’ll forget…there is nothing like a piece of orange flagging tape waving at you to remind you.

Make a job list.

The Shopping Part

If you love starting from seed now is a great time to peruse both some of the new and wonderful and the old faithful varieties. I’ve set up a bunch in the store and I’ve got my eye on some Renee’s seeds. This year we've also launched our online seed store

Online Seed Store

A great learning website and seedy event website is www.seeds.ca It will not only tell you about all of the seedy events but there is great information on pollinators too!

Now is a great time to check out some new garden tools. Peruse your job list and make sure you have the tools you need to get the job done right, quickly and with a minimum of wear and tear on you!

The Actual Work Part

Pruning Trees and Shrubs

Pruning

Now is a good time to prune. And by prune I mean removal of dead, damaged, diseased or crossing and rubbing branches to enhance the Natural shape of the tree. I do not mean drag out the rusty old hack saw and chop away at will. If you have pruned correctly you will not be able to see where you have pruned but rather notice the natural shape of the tree.

There are plenty of workshops out there (our early 2015 Spring workshop schedule will be posted in the next couple of days) as well as reading on proper pruning techniques. There is no excuse for ugly pruning jobs…so don’t make me come out there!!!

If you have questions our horticulturalists and arborists would be happy to provide advice.

Dormant Oil and Lime Sulphur Spray

Dormant Spraying

Dormant spraying. If you have a problem with pests or fungus you can spray with a lime sulphur dormant spray kit. Or if you have a pest problem such as scale, mites you can just apply the horticultural oil. The dormant oil will act as a smother coat on dormant insects. It is not selective and will also smother some overwintering pollinators if they are in the spray zone. Be mindful of when and where you spray and if it is really necessary. I know I am starting to sound like an old broken record but our native pollinators need all the help they can get!

Dividing Perennials

Now is a great time to begin dividing up hardy perennials as long as the ground is not frozen or really waterlogged. And if the ground isn’t frozen or waterlogged it’s also starting to be a good time to move hardy plants around.

Seed Starting

Seed Starting

Seed starting – you can get cracking indoors with some tomatoes, eggplant and peppers to name a few. Outdoors you may be able to start a few cool season crops like Kale. Otherwise wait another a week or two until most frosts have passed.

Organize & Clean

Organize and clean your garden workplace. Whether it’s a garden shed or part of the garage a clean and organized work area will make your gardening life better, simple as that. Clean, organize and shuffle the really big shed spiders away from your most frequently used tools...shudder. Also set up a sand bucket (a 5 gal bucket will do fine) to clean off digging shovels and other tools. It’s also good idea to set up a little dry off and clean up area for boots, soggy garden jackets and some small wooden dowlings to put muddy garden gloves to dry.

Get Ready to Fertilize & Lime

Check and organize fertilizers, lime, seeds etc. and make sure you are ready to go when the weather breaks!

That ought to do you for now. Don’t worry, I’ll think up more work for you next month!

Cheers - Laurelle


Tuesday, February 10, 2015
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Winter Gardens

As February begins, many people begin to experience a common malady called 'Gardenus addictus'. This somewhat uncommon condition afflicts more people than you would otherwise assume. Subtle symptoms begin to manifest as visits to gardening websites, hours spent pouring over seed catalogs and wandering aimlessly around empty garden beds. More extreme symptoms lead to days spent on Pinterest, visits to local garden centres in the pouring rain, seemingly random plunging of hands into cold, muddy soil, caressing weeds, and even performing tool maintenance on tools you cleaned last week. In order to provide some relief, we've taken the time to put together a small list of plants that will add interest to otherwise desolate gardens and landscapes. Enjoy!

6 winter shrubs for your garden

Rubinetta Japanese Skimmia

Skimmia japonica ‘Rubinetta’

This lovely evergreen shrub is a small to medium sized plant ideal for shade and part shade. Showy red winter flower buds open to small white flowers in early spring. Has a nice light fragrance. Male variety. Plant female skimmia nearby to produce striking red berries on those plants. Grows 2-3ft in height and spread.

Midwinter Fire Shrub Dogwood

Cornus sericea ‘Midwinter Fire’

Midwinter Fire is a striking shrub dogwood variety that produces clusters of white flowers in late spring and early summer followed by blue-black fruit. Darker green leaves turn yellow in winter before they fall. In winter the bare stems turn brilliant shades of orange, red and white. Best in full sun and moist , but well drained soils. Grows up to 8-10ft tall. Prune frequently to improve and manage shape. Extremely hardy to zone 2.

Double Play Winter Heather

Double Play is a lovely landscape plant that combines two varieties of winter heather in one pot. Blooms in winter through early spring in shades of lovely pink and striking white. Plant in groups for instant winter interest. Plant heathers in full sun and moist, but well drained acidic soils. Improve the acidity of your soil with peat, pine needles or with garden amendments.

Fragrant Sweetbox (Sarcococca)

Sarcoccoca ruscifolia

Sweetbox is another gorgeous, yet underused, evergreen shrub for shady locations. Upright growth habit and medium to dark green foliage is accented by masses of late winter blooming, delicate white, star-shaped flowers. Amazing fragrance will waft to fill the entire planting area. Red berries follow the blooms. An elegant addition to the garden border and can also be used as a hedge. Plant it somewhere you can enjoy the fragrance in winter. For example, near the front door, patio or along a frequently used walkway.

Witchhazel | Hamamelis varieties

Witchhazel

Hamamelis x intermedia

One of our favourite deciduous small trees or large shrubs is the Witchhazel. They bloom in late winter producing masses of crinkled, paperty, spidery looking flowers in shades of yellow, orange and red depending on the variety. Shown at the top of the article is a relatively new variety called ‘Angelly’. Other more common varieties are shown immediately above . Witchhazels carry rippled green leaves that also offer nice autumn colour before they fall. Grow in sun to part shade. Great vase shape and small size makes it ideal for even smaller homes and landscapes.

Winter Jasmine

Jasminum nudiflorum

This early blooming scrambling vine is a reliable and tough as nails plant ideal for adding vertical interest. Long, thin, arching green, cord-like stems with small leaves should be trained on trellises, arbors or fances. Bright yellow blooms in late winter. Grow in sun to part shade. Unlike other Jasmines it has no fragrance, but does add a lot of colour to otherwise drab winter gardens.

If you are interested in any of these wonderful plants, drop by and visit us at Art's Nursery or give us a call at 604.882.1201. As always, check ahead to confirm availability as our selection is always changing.


Wednesday, November 12, 2014
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Winter Gardens

When our flowers have faded and the leaves have fallen, its time for the workhorses of the garden to start performing. These include the evergreens, the conifers, and the plants with other points of interest, including attractive bark and sparkling, colourful berries. In this blog post, we'll show case some of the best plants with attractive berries for your fall and winter garden.

As we've also focused on Holly this month, we won't discuss those plants in this article even though they offer fantastic winter interest with their colourful evergreen foliage and their colourful red berries.

Gaultheria procumbens - Wintergreen

Wintergreen

Gaultheria procumbens

Wintergreen is a colourful, low growing groundcover shrub with bright red berries that appear in the late fall and winter. Gaultheria procumbens is an excellent groundcover for acidic soils. It produces a dense mat of glossy dark green leaves that brighten with a redish hue in the fall. White to Pale Pink flowers appear in June followed by bright red berries. While we would advise eating them, the berries have a distinct peppermint, wintergreen-fresh taste, but are rather pithy and inedible. Foliage is evergreen and retains its colour year round. It is best grown in part sun to part shade in semi-moist, but well drained soils. Mature plants will usually grow to 12 inches tall and up to 36 inches across.

Female Japanese Skimmia

Female Japanese Skimmia

Skimmia japonica Female

Skimmia are a classic evergreen shrub for fall and winter interest. Glossy green foliage is accented by white blooms in the spring and on female plants, red, holly-like berries appear in autumn and winter. Skimmia come in female and male varieties. The females will produce the berry as long as at least one male skimmia is planted in the area. It is a great plant for full to part sun and is an excellent plant for the seaside. Water regularly as needed. Grows up to 2-5ft wide and 3-6ft across. Hardy in zones 7-9.

Callicarpa Profusion, Beauty Berry

Profusion Beauty Berry

Callicarpa bodinieri 'Profusion'

Beauty Berry is a superb deciduous shrub valued for display of abundant clusters of long lasting violet berries along branches in fall. Berries are attractive to birds and can really add interest to an otherwise bare garden. New leaf growth has exciting bronze tinge. Small purplish pink flowers appear in summer amongst the large green leaves. Prune in late winter to early spring to encourage new growth. Ideal for use as a specimen, in a border or as a mass planting. Moderate growing to 6-8ft tall and wide. Best when planted in full sun. Hardy in USDA zones 5-8.

Brandywine Viburnum

Brandywine Viburnum

Viburnum nudum 'Bulk' / Witherod Viburnum

Brandywine Viburnum is a relative newcomer and provides a truly spectacular display of fall colour. Abundant green berries transform to vivid pink and blue, contrasting with the wine-coloured fall foliage. Deer resistant. Is an excellent addition to mixed borders. This viburnum prefers moist, but well drained soil. Prune after flowering if needed. Grows 5-6ft tall and wide at maturity. Hardy in USDA zones 5-9.

Scarlet Pearl Snowberry

Scarlet Pearl Snowberry

Symphoricarpos 'Scarlet Pearl'

This delightful pseudo-native plant features light pink blooms in summer followed by a vigorous crop of large pink fruit beginning in fall, becoming especially showy on otherwise bare branches in winter. Plant where berries can be enjoyed from the indoors. Cut fruiting stems can last up to 2 weeks in floral arrangements. Scarlet Pearl is a perfect plant for spicing up northern native plant landscapes and wild garden woodlands. Deciduous. Prefers to be planted in full to part sun in moist soils. Grows up to 4ft tall and wide and hardy in USDA zones 3-7.

As always, please call ahead, 604.882.1201, to confirm availability if you are making a special trip for one of these plants. Our selection is always changing and availability may be limited on some varieties.

Parneys Cotoneaster

Parney's Cotoneaster

Cotoneaster lacteus

This large evergreen shrub produces attractive balls of white flowers followed by showy red berries. It's an excellent plant the back of a border or in a garden setting. Leaves are large and dark green in colour. can be pruned as needed. Prefers to be planted in full sun and any moist, but well drained soils. Grows 6-12ft high and equally as wide. Hardy to zone 6.


Sunday, November 9, 2014
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Gardening

November had blown in with wind, rain, a bit of cold, more rain and uh…rain. Welcome to winter on the West Coast. The bright side? Eggnog latte’s are back that’s what! So I went to our friendly neighbourhood outdoor wear stores and was looking for a rain hat, yeah, I know not fashionable, but one that would help me work in my garden and orchard and walk the dogs.

Hoods are no good…I need to be able to see what I’m doing. You know what I found in all three outdoor stores that I went to? They all sent the hats back to head office to make room for the woolen toques. What the..? What kind of weather do we generally have November through April on the WET Coast?!

Any idea what a soggy woollen toque does to my already frizzy silver (ok multicoloured) hair? Well, aside from smelling like a damp sheep my already ah eclectic look has taken a turn for downright witchy! I have my eye on a nice oiled ‘Man From Snowy River’ type hat and in the meantime my relatives from Newfoundland have UPS’d me a lovely authentic Sou’Wester hat, with earflaps, thanks…thanks a lot. So here’s your list, I also send you frizz free good wishes and for those gentleman growing a stache for MOvember…may the growth be with you.

Lawns

I think, quite possibly, mowing might be done for the season – I am pretty sure of this because I saw hubby doing a happy dance when he put the mower into the shed with little parting kick. He is not a lawn man. There still might be time to lime, aerate and topdress if you can find a dry day. Working on a soggy lawn however will pretty much make your efforts for naught so if we continue with the monsoons you will have to wait until late winter/early spring. What you can do however, is watch for drainage problems. Make a note and then adjust the drainage during dry weather. You can also drain the gas from your mower and even take it in for an overhaul or get the blades sharpened so you can beat the crowd getting it done in the spring.

Bobbex and Plantskydd Deer & Critter Repellants

Garden Beds

Do some minor tidying and dividing or moving of shrubs or perennials if needed. Avoid trampling really soggy soil. This is a good time to add hardy perennials and shrubs. It is also still a great time to plant bulbs! Remember if you have lots and lots of squirrels, you can try soaking the bulbs in Bobbex or Plantskydd or planting each group with a Fritillaria which masks the scent of tasty tulips or crocus, or even putting a bit of chicken wire over the bed. This is also a great time to take stock of your garden design and adjust if more evergreen or structural ‘bones’ are needed.

raking leaves

Trees and Shrubs

Keep raking. It works off the Halloween candy. You can also plant and move trees and shrubs if necessary. Remember to always water in your new plantings even if it’s raining as the watering will get rid of airpockets. For those of you with Palm Trees, do not wrap the crowns with burlap. This collects water and encourages rot. Instead you can wrap the palm tree with old fashioned 7 volt twinkle lights and if we get a cold snap, leave them turned on. They will create enough heat to keep your hardy palm happy and ice free. you can also protect the crowns with a sheet of clear plastic. Just the act of keeping the wind and ice off these evergreens is often enough to get them through the winter.

winter pot accents

Pots and Containers

Time to rip out those last few annuals and spruce up your pots with evergreen colour, twigs and stems and a little bit of sparkle. We’ll have some fun classes coming up for this as well as wreaths, Christmas Fairy Gardens, and all sorts of other good stuff in the workshop section on our website. Gather up your pots and re-work the groupings close to the house. Consider adding some winter interest like Hollies, Birch Trunks or Berries for added effect.

While some are already available, we'll have a full selection of these decorative accents by mid to late November. For the pots that are dedicated to summer and won’t be on show, cluster them together up close to the house and if you have some borderline hardy beauties you can wrap them with some kind of insulation (the pots not the plants), such as carpet underlay, bubble wrap etc.

Fall planting, Spring Blooming Bulbs

Bulbs, Tubers etc

Time to bring your Dahlias, Cannas and other tropical bulbs and tuber in. Make sure you cut off the greens, hose off the soil and allow to dry before putting them away. I like to use a sprinkle of cinnamon and a bit of coconut fibre in a brown paper bag. It's also not too late to plant bulbs. Just plant on a day when the ground is not frozen. There is still a great selection of daffodils, tulips, hyacinths and more available instore and you can now <a href="http://www.artsnursery.com/catalog/spring-flowering-bulbs" target="_blank">shop online</a>

Frozen Water Feature

Ponds & Water Features

Keep skimming out the leaves and removing other dead plant material. If you remove your pumps and hoses then now is a good time to remove them before we get a freeze.

Tools

If you haven’t already done so, take stock, clean shovels and hoes in a sand bucket. Oil handles and do a general taking stock. Might be a good time to write a Christmas-want list. you can even shop online for some of our tools.

That is probably enough for now, Happy November…or at least Happy Eggnog Latte season!


Thursday, February 9, 2012
Posted By: Laurelle Olfdord-Down in Gardening

GroundhogI appreciate and admire the groundhog Punxsutawny Phil.

I even think he’s cute.

But 6 more weeks of winter?? I think he is mistaken this year.

The sunshine that has started off February has slightly thawed out out my gardeners inclination.

A couple more days of it to steam off the damp and I might even start to get excited about gardening.

Start slow…stretch…daydream a little and then poke around your garden, never know what you might find just waking up.

Here’s your list:

-You can do your winter pruning now of trees and shrubs. Never remove more than one third of your plant at any time. Sometimes that is just one pruning cut. Follow International Society of Arboriculture’s pruning guidelines.

-If pruning Cherry Blossom trees or Forsythia or other early blooming trees or shrubs, make a bouquet of the branches and place in a vase of water inside. They should start blooming in a week. It`s a nice way to usher in an early spring.

Flowering Cherries and Forsythia

-If needed, apply dormant spray to fruits and roses. Walk through the area first and watch for native insects. Avoid spraying if they are present. Our native pollinators can use all the help they can get.

Always identify the problem first and see if there is another way to prevent it such as sticky tanglefoot for winter moth, or raking and bagging the leaves to help prevent scab or black spot.

Dormant Spray Kit Dolopril Lime

- You can apply lime towards the end of the month. Avoid working or walking on lawn or garden beds when the ground is frozen. If ground is dry and not frozen you can aerate.

-If we continue to get some lovely weather you can start to tidy and topdress garden beds towards the end of the month with compost or manure.

-If you have stored any tubers such as Cannas or Dahlias etc. this is your reminder to check on them and remove any damaged ones. Add new sawdust if needed, turn and dust. Cinnamon works well for me.

If you have any that are shrivelled you can stick them in a tub of room temp water for a day and then dry off and put back into their storage container.

Seeds

-Sow your sweet peas outside.

- Start your tomatoes inside and keep your eyes open for all of the new seeds, seed potatoes, asparagus and any other flowers and veggies that you would like to try.

- Seeds are cost effective, you get a lot of bang for your hard earned buck! Try something new this year!!

- Take stock of your tools and start your repair and wish list.

- You can continue planting trees and shrubs as long as the ground isn`t frozen or waterlogged.

-Inspect your house plants and start to think about an overhaul. Pot up those that need it towards the end of the month and let go of the ones that need to go. Yes, I`m talking to you. It`s ok to say goodbye to that shrivelled African Violet and the Boston fern with the three leaves left. Visit our florist and we would be happy to get you a new indoor tropical, or perhaps even two!

-Great time to order up hedging cedars as they`ll be digging fresh during the dry days.

Enjoy the sunshine and hang in there.

Spring is just around the corner... really.


Sponsored Advertisement

Be Part Of Our Growing Community!

Subscribe, Like or Follow Us Online

  Learn More >>

Blog Profile

arts nursery logo
Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

We pride ourselves on providing high quality plant, expert advice and an exceptional gardening experience.

Noteworthy Blogs

Sow and Dipity DIY Blog

Blog Search

Recent Posts

Thursday, November 9, 2017
Top 6 Colourful Winter Plants

Winter is here and so are some spectacular colorful plants! Although it can be harder to find things...

Tuesday, November 7, 2017
Amazing Amaryllis

What do Poinsettias, Prepared Hyacinths, Paperwhite Daffodils and Amaryllis have in common? They are...

Friday, October 6, 2017
Gardening With Ornamental Grasses

If you’re looking for low maintenance plants that provide lovely texture and movement in your garden...

Friday, October 6, 2017
8 New Colourful Companion Bulbs for Fall 2017

Bulb growers are doing their best to make flower combinations as easy as possible. In fact, they hav...

Thursday, September 21, 2017
Favourite Plants for Fall Planters

While anytime is a good time to plant, Fall is particularly rewarding because of the immediate resul...

Friday, June 16, 2017
Plant Something BC Contest

It's your last chance to enter the Plant Something BC contest. Here's how to enter:

Friday, June 16, 2017
Plants for a Tropical Paradise

With summer just around the corner, now is a great time to add a touch of the tropics to your garden...

Wednesday, March 29, 2017
Strawberry Growing Basics

If you ask people what their favourite summertime berry is… odds are they will say Strawberry. These...

Wednesday, March 29, 2017
New Flower Bulbs For 2017

Is it possible that Christmas comes again in March? Every year, new summer blooming bulb varieties a...


Tag Cloud

Top 6 Colourful Winter Plants Winter Interest Plant for Winter Colour Cold Hardy Plants Top 6 Plants Top 6 Winter Plants for Winter Interest Winter Plants Viburnum Davidii Leucothoe Rainbow Crabapple Red Sentinel Crabapple Tree Evergreen Shrub Skimmia Female Cedar Sienna Sunset Globe Cedar Skimmia Cedar for Winter Colorful Crabapple Fruit Tree Winteramaryllis hippeastrum buy amaryllis amaryllis bulbs indoor bulbs amaryllis care waxed amaryllisgrasses ornamental grasses gardening cool season grass warm season grass miscanthus pennisetumbulbs fall bulbs tulips daffodils colourful companions new flower bulbsfall fall planters fall plantsplantsomethingbc contest bcplantstropical tropical plants outdoor tropical palm trees palms banana plants jasmine monkey puzzle tree phormium new Zealand flax agapanthusstrawberries strawberry strawberry care strawberry varieties day neutral strawberries june bearing strawberries alpine strawberries everbearing strawberries growing strawberries types of strawberries flower bulbs new bulbs dahlias lilies canna calla florissahellebore helleborus spring series hellebore Lenten rose Christmas rose perennial shade perennials annas red pennys pink winter jewels series gold collection hellebores winter dreams helleboreswinter gardens november november garden calendar winter garden tasks plants winter plants garden gardenings november gardens winter interest plants plants with winter interest unique bulbs rare bulbs unique flower bulbs allium narcissi corydalis snow crocus September fall gardening September gardening hyacinths bulb planting tulipa Canadian celebration tulips tulip Canadian celebration Canadian bulbs red and white bulbs white tulips red tulips patriotic tulipssucculents echeveria crassula pachyphytum kalanchoe lifesaver plant huernia haworthia portulaca aeonium zwartkop firesticks tender succulentsjune gardens summer to-do list cannas papyrus gardenia silk tree fig treehydrangea shrub deciduous shrubs growing hydrangeas hydrangea basics how to grow hydrangeas hydrangea macrophylla mophead hydrangea lacecap hydrangea pannicle hydrangea oakleaf hydrangea smooth hydrangea pruning hydrangeas reblooming hydrangeas endless summer hydrangeas

Blog Roll

Other interesting gardening blogs that we follow include:

Blog RSS Feed

Keep in touch by subscribing to our RSS/Atom News Feeds


Subscribe Via FeedBurner

 Subscribe in a reader

Copyright (c) 2017 Art's Nursery Ltd.  | 8940 192nd Street, Surrey, BC, Canada, V4N 3W8  | tel: 604.882.1201  | SiteMap  | Privacy Statement |